A dermatologist checks for skin cancer. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
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Worried about your moles? GPs are here to help – except they’re not allowed

A deluge of mole-owners have put pressure on health services.

A letter arrived this past week from our local dermatology department, telling us that it is closed to new patients. Actually, that’s not quite true: the department will still see suspected cases of the two most serious forms of skin cancer, but everyone else will have to go elsewhere. Except that there isn’t anywhere else to go. GPs manage the vast bulk of skin problems but there is a range of conditions that need consultant input. For the time being, that service is not available.

There are a few factors behind this, not least the government’s 18-week referral-to-treatment target. If a hospital isn’t able to see patients within that timescale then it gets a big slap on the wrist. The immediate solution for a department facing imminent breaches is to stop taking referrals, giving itself breathing space in which to deal with the backlog.

Where has the backlog come from? The dermatologists believe it’s a direct result of the Be Clear on Cancer campaign, the skin cancer component of which was piloted in our area last year, advising people to get moles checked if they’d noticed any change in them. The problem is that a) virtually everyone has moles, and b) invariably over time they change. Most often they are harmless. The problem with cancer campaigns is they push these issues to the forefront of people’s minds, so when a small change occurs it becomes disproportionately worrying. This has led to a surge in the numbers of people consulting their GPs with pigmented skin lesions. While dermatology would like to blame the cancer awareness campaign for its present woes, it has, as a specialty, made its own contributions to the crisis.

The problem for GPs is that, although it is usually possible to be sure a mole is harmless, sometimes there is an element of doubt. In the early years of my career, we would solve this dilemma by making a simple excision under local anaesthetic at the surgery and sending the specimen to the lab to ensure it was definitely benign. On rare occasions, the biopsy would show it was an unsuspected melanoma (the most aggressive form of skin cancer), which would require that the patient be referred for wider excision of the problem area, and possibly further cancer treatment.

Over the past decade, however, this practice has come to be frowned upon, largely because dermatologists are mistrustful of GPs doing an adequate job of the primary excision. In fact, most GPs carrying out minor surgery are more than competent – but the dermatologists’ response was to turn the assessment of pigmented lesions into a secondary-care-only service. Any GP these days who performs an excision biopsy of a pigmented lesion that turns out to be an unsuspected melanoma will face an investigation and severe sanction for having dared to deviate from “best practice”.

This same process of the specialisation of skin surgery has extended to encompass even the most indolent form of skin cancer, called basal cell carcinoma. This rarely spreads, and most types are readily treatable in primary care. This was also standard practice in my early years as a GP but again it has now become a specialist-only pursuit. GP minor surgery has gone from being something performed at virtually every practice to something only a minority maintains skills in.

The resultant flow of work to hospitals has been rather good for dermatologists, ensuring a steady expansion of consultant numbers and the general building of empires. Now, however, the chickens are coming home to roost. We are a society increasingly fearful of disease, bombarded on all sides by “Watch Out!” messages.

The recent tidal wave of worried mole-owners could have been managed in primary care but for the deskilling and dismantling of GP minor surgery. We need to restate our confidence in competent GPs being allowed to manage most of these cases without referral. Then dermatologists may again find that they have the capacity to do what only they can properly do. 

This article first appeared in the 13 February 2015 issue of the New Statesman, Assad vs Isis

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.