Chart of the day (slight return): Deadly earthquakes

The Lancet is leading with a series of articles on health inequalities in Europe, and while the series as a whole is fascinating, there was one chart in particular which stood out for me, in the article "Health and health systems in the Commonwealth of Independent States":

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Take a closer look at Armenia's life expectancy. That's the effect of the Spitak earthquake, which killed at least 25,000 people, and left half a million homeless. It was so deadly that it marked the first time since World War II that the Soviet Government asked the USA for humanitarian aid – and it lowered life expectancy by a decade.

The chart also shows a lesser, but more prolonged, plummet in life expectancy in Tajikistan, around 1993. That's the effects of the Tajik civil war, which lasted five years and killed up to 100,000 people.

For obvious reasons, the Lancet piece doesn't examine those one-off events. And "avoid earthquakes and civil wars" isn't the most useful advice to a nation trying to improve its life expectancy. But as a powerful display of data, there's not much that can improve on that chart.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.