Monopoly to replace an iconic piece – but which is most iconic?

Hasbro has announced a vote to drop a piece from the standard monopoly set. But it's not as immutable as you may remember.

Hasbro, the manufacturers of Monopoly, is holding an online poll to decide which of five new pieces – a diamond ring, guitar, robot, helicopter or cat – should be introduced to a new edition of the game. To boost the PR-appeal of the poll, a second vote will be held to determine which piece should be removed to make room for the new one.

"When we decided to replace one of the tokens in the game, we knew we had to involve our fans in the process," said Hasbro's Eric Nyman. But what's interesting is quite how many times the tokens in monopoly have changed before. Using data from World of Monopoly, I drew up a quick chart to see. I obviously excluded themed sets, but deluxe editions, vintage editions and so on were included. One large caveat: the dataset is for the US edition, not the UK, which explains the presence of two interlopers, the Cannon and Cowboy. Click on it for a larger version:

Only one piece has been in every edition of Monopoly: the lowly top hat. Which means, obviously, that it's the one that should go. No gods, no kings, no top hats! REBEL!

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.