Group hug: people embrace during a Cuddle Workshop in London. Photo: Getty
Cuddle workshops: the latest solution to loneliness
By Sophie McBain - 18 September 10:00

Could it be that, in a digital age, people are left missing physical touch? Sophie McBain goes under-cuddle to find out.

Soho’s characters have gone – what now? Photo: Getty
This week I am trying to get inside the head of a young woman who’s new to London
By Nicholas Lezard - 18 September 9:01

Learning that someone is new to the city you live in calls for reassessments of it; or even assessments.

Constant headaches often have a more prosaic basis than feared. Photo: Flickr/Sarah G
The woman was suffering from headaches and fearing the worst. Then I weighed her
By Phil Whitaker - 15 September 10:42

Dr Phil Whitaker’s Health Matters column. 

Big beastie: the bugs can consume up to six times their weight in blood. Photo: Getty
The day we discovered we had bed bugs
By Jonn Elledge - 11 September 10:00

The man from the council made sense of our symptoms immediately. Our bites came in clusters of three and there were splashes of blood on the sheets. He diagnosed bed bugs.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, with their eldest son George and spaniel Lupo. Photo: Michael Middleton/WPA Pool/Getty Images
Admit it, you are interested in the royal pregnancy – and that’s why we will never be a republic
By Glosswitch - 08 September 15:06

It is not healthy for an entire country to have such an investment in the contents of a woman’s womb.

A few columns of meaningless names and numbers pop up on screen. Photo: Getty
The night the Estranged Wife and I decided to take a look at our investments
By Nicholas Lezard - 04 September 8:49

I’m not planning on retiring, but sometimes the world has other ideas, so it is wise to make plans.

Audiences may no longer understand Monty Python’s Life of Brian because of the biblical references.
Why religious education is letting our children down
By Adam Dinham - 03 September 15:02

Religious illiteracy leads to an anxiety about the role of religion in the public sphere: from fear of terrorism to fear of exclusion and fear of litigation.

Lurid: The Rip Van Winkle section of Rock City's fairy-tales tableaux. Photo: K Tempest Bradford/Flickr
A visit to Rock City on Lookout Mountain is a bad trip through a kitsch fairytale grotto
By Will Self - 01 September 10:25

In front of me was the most lurid tableau I’d ever seen: a vast glass case housing myriad individual little scenes from fairy tales, each one illustrated by posed figurines and ditsy bits of model-making.

A football fan eats chips before a match. Photo: Getty
Thin people don’t just eat differently to fat people. They live completely different lives
By Helen Lewis - 01 September 10:12

One of the biggest lies about obesity is that it’s simply about eating too much and not doing enough exercise – problems are often far deeper rooted. 

The politician and his playmaker: Tony Blair and Alex Ferguson in 1996. Photo: Steve Eason/Getty
Pitch perfect: the ten football matches that changed the world
By John Bew - 31 August 11:11

Jim Murphy’s book combines a blokey ethos with a serious tone, and includes the Eton-smashing 1883 FA Cup final, the 1943 Spanish Cup semi-final and Robben Island’s  “Makana League”.

MK Dons striker Benik Afobe celebrates the team's third goal against Manchester United. Photo: Getty
Why MK Dons’ 4-0 victory over Manchester United didn’t cause universal joy
By Martin Cloake - 29 August 14:36

How would you feel if the club you supported had been stolen from you, relocated, renamed, made into something entirely different?

Bake-off: a table of cakes for the Oxford-Cambridge boat race. Photo: Getty
Tracey Thorn: The kids protest but sugary treats are an ever stickier issue
By Tracey Thorn - 29 August 10:00

The low-fat yoghurts I shovel down my neck and the smoothies I’ve been promoting to my vegetable-allergic teenage son might just as well have been crystal meth.

An alleyway in Edinburgh. Photo: Getty
The allure of the closet: is kink only sexy when it is underground?
By Margaret Corvid - 26 August 12:40

Even in the age of Fifty Shades of Grey, kink is still a taboo. Margaret Corvid examines what can happen when private lives are made public.

Dead man walking: a man dressed as a zombie in Hyde Park, London, August 2013. Photo: Getty
I think I might be dead – it would explain a lot about the past seven years
By Nicholas Lezard - 22 August 16:59

A friend comes round with some old copies of the New Scientist and I read a piece about Cotard’s syndrome, whose symptoms present as the conviction that you are dead.

Glutton meets gourmet: our ideas about healthy eating are becoming ever more confused. Image: Valero Doval
Slightly overweight people live longer – so is it time to rethink our dietary advice?
By Julian Baggini - 21 August 11:50

One of the most unfortunate consequences of this constant revising of recommendations is the belief that no one knows what a good diet is. But look at the bigger picture and the consensus holds steady over time.

Students open their exam results at Winterbourne Academy, near Bristol. Photo: Matt Cardy/Getty Images
GCSE results day reveals the sinister side of social media
By George Gillett - 21 August 10:30

As students across the country receive their GCSE results, many will be realising that there is no escape from comparisons with their peers thanks to the growth of social media. But does it represent the truth?

Shiny and new: the new Kings Cross Station is a far cry from its former grim incarnation. Photo: Getty
King’s Cross – from derelict wasteland to caffeinated utopia
By Ed Smith - 21 August 10:00

In the mid-1990s, when I often caught the train out to Cambridge, King’s Cross was known for two things: a dirty, decaying station and prostitutes. Now I secretly enjoy missing a connection.

Harriet Harman at Wimbledon this summer. Photo: Getty
The problem with Harriet Harman’s proposed gambling tax
By Martin Cloake - 18 August 15:30

Labour think the levy can be used to fund elite sports development as well as grass-roots sports. So, they must be hoping for a lot of gambling in order to generate the sums needed.

Ched Evans playing for Sheffield United in 2012. Photo: Getty
Ched Evans and Ma’lik Richmond: why should rapists get a second chance to be celebrated?
By Sarah Ditum - 15 August 12:31

Sports stars who are convicted of rape get to return as heroes on the field. If there were justice for women, rape would be a crime that makes us all turn in disgust from the perpetrator.

With students paying more than ever, richer data is needed for them to accurately know how much their course will enhance their prospects.
What is the value of university?
By Ryan Shorthouse - 14 August 18:05

With students paying more than ever, richer data is needed for them to accurately know how much their course will enhance their prospects. 

Two heads aren’t better than one: even the most sophisticated antidepressants seem unequal to the challenge of curing our modern malaise
Shrinking horizons: can science offer new answers to mental illness?
By Lisa Appignanesi - 14 August 15:00

It is clear that the NHS and the rise of scientific medicine in the west count among the greatest achievements of the postwar years. But can doctors really be the providers of all our goods?

Bug's life: a woman tends to a shelf full of cockroaches in jars in a lab, c.1955. Photo: Getty
The patient complained of insects crawling on her skin. Then she handed me a glass jar
By Phil Whitaker - 14 August 10:00

The “matchbox sign” describes the tendency of a particular sort of patient to bring spurious evidence in a small container to show the doctor.

Housing in Knightsbridge, London, an area where much property sits empty. Photo: Getty
Live in guardians: one radical solution to the UK’s housing problem
By Barbara Speed - 14 August 10:00

Property guardianship emerged in the Netherlands in the 1990s, seen as a way of dealing with the large numbers of squatters occupying empty Dutch buildings. 

Magic number: a bar owner celebrates his big win near Barcelona, 2010
The day I (almost) won the lottery in Spain
By William Cook - 14 August 10:00

William Cook was on his way to buy a ticket for “El Gordo” in a small town in Tenerife but changed his mind at the last minute. It’s a decision he’s lived to regret. 

Lazing on a sunny afternoon: summertime on Hampstead Heath. Photo: Getty
Nicholas Lezard: A trip down memory pain on the way back from the Heath
By Nicholas Lezard - 07 August 10:00

Nicholas Lezard’s Down and Out column. 

An infant inspects a work at the National Exhibition of Children's Art at the Royal Institute Galleries
No, Jake Chapman, opening culture to young people is never a waste of time
By Robert Macquarie - 06 August 12:00

The artist, nominated for the Turner Prize in 2003, has stoked controversy to gain media attention. It is still worth resisting his fundamentally misguided claims.

Laurie Penny and Mary Beard in Conway Hall.
VIDEO: Laurie Penny and Mary Beard discuss the public voice of women
By New Statesman - 04 August 11:56

Highlights from our Conway Hall event on 30 July 2014.

Outside the Matchroom Stadium. Photo: Getty
It’s not you, Leyton Orient: why a sexist song means I’m walking away from my football club
By James McMahon - 01 August 14:47

After tweeting his disapproval of a sexist song sung in the stands, James McMahon found himself on the receiving end of a social media onslaught.

An Iranian woman adjusts her headscarf in central Tehran. Photo: Getty
High heels and hijabs: Iran’s sexual revolution
By Ramita Navai - 01 August 10:00

For more than 30 years, the Islamic Republic has been obsessively battling against sex, but as with anything that is suppressed or banned, people have learned to sidestep the punitive regulations. 

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