A lesbian couple at Tokyo Pride. Photo: Getty
Lesbian by choice: Eleanor Margolis reviews Julie Bindel's Straight Expectations
By Eleanor Margolis - 25 July 12:43

What Does It Mean to Be Gay Today? asks Julie Bindel in the subtitle of her new book. For me, it means enduring endless dull and pukey nights out on the scene, says Eleanor Margolis.

Animal rescue: but in this case it was dog that saved master, says John Dolan. Photo: Marcus Peel
How one man escaped homelessness through drawing – and his bull terrier muse
By Sophie McBain - 24 July 13:50

John Dolan spent almost two decades in the “revolving door” between homelessness and prison. That changed when he adopted George in 2009. 

Heatwave: but part of the East Anglian coast contains some of England's poorest-performing schools: Photo: Getty
Ukip does well in areas with failing schools
By Tim Wigmore - 24 July 13:00

Great Yarmouth, Norwich and Waveney all fall in the area of East Anglia where Ukip recorded its best results in local elections. They also contain some of the country’s worst schools.

Generation Ritalin: between 10 and 30% of students are estimated to have taken ADHD medication. Photo Getty
Revising on Ritalin: the students who use ADHD meds
By Ajit Niranjan - 24 July 13:00

Between 10 and 30 per cent of British university students have taken pills such as Modafinil and Ritalin to improve their memory and heighten their concentration.

Australia's Michael Rogers celebrates before crossing the finish line at the end of the sixteenth stage of the Tour de France, July 22, 2014. Photo: AFP/ Eric Feferberg/Getty
Explained: how to win a Tour de France sprint
By Bryce Dyer - 22 July 17:11

The Tour de France reaches a climax this weekend as the cyclists head towards the Champs-Élysées final stage. Here's the theories, tactics and sprints behind the race to the finishing line. 

Fluoro feet: Ghanaian players sport colourful boots during a World Cup training session, 18 June. Photo: Getty
Bright boots, shaving foam, dodgy slogans and nice teeth . . . What a World Cup that was
By Hunter Davies - 18 July 13:00

For about ten years, the back pages of football magazines have featured coloured boots. I thought they would never catch on – but blow me, they’re everywhere now!

Latest squeeze: James Fearnley of The Pogues performs in New York, March 2011. Photo: Getty
How my literary life became an ever-lengthening index of people to avoid
By Nicholas Lezard - 18 July 12:30

With the editors to avoid and the editors to endure, book publishers’ parties can be a minefield – thank heavens for the Pogues’ accordionist...

Greta Gerwig and Mickey Sumner in Frances Ha.
Grown women don’t need to have a “best friend”
By Alice Robb - 11 July 9:40

If “best friendship” is on the rise, what does it mean?

 Bottles of antibiotics line a shelf at a Publix Supermarket pharmacy August 7, 2007 in Miami, Florida. Photo: Getty Images
What next, when the drugs won’t work?
By Zac Goldsmith - 08 July 17:06

The government has made progress on the urgent crisis of antimicrobial resistance, but sustained public pressure is still needed, says Zac Goldsmith.

Rising cities.
If you want to go to university, you’re better off poor in London than rich anywhere else
By Haf Davies - 07 July 13:00

Reports show that London schools are outperforming the rest of the country. And it’s not just London - the “city effect” is improving results in Birmingham and Manchester too.

Boys' done good: Jack Wilshere and Frank Lampard of the England team after the Costa Rica game, 24 June. Photo: Getty
Why we should actually be proud of England’s World Cup performance
By Hunter Davies - 04 July 11:12

I am honestly and truly now coming to the conclusion that England did astonishingly well. In fact, they overachieved. 

Orange squash: Ron Vlaar and Andrés Guardado during the Netherlands v Mexico match, 29 June. Photo: Getty
This is Fifa-land: colourful, attractive spectators in team shirts playing by the rules
By Jonathan Wilson - 03 July 17:35

There is a set way to behave. Team shirts and face paint have become de rigueur, while Mexican waves now interrupt the view of anybody trying to watch the football with irritating regularity. 

This is what Tinder is like for lesbians. Honest. Photo: Getty
Like so many things in life, Tinder is just different for lesbians
By Eleanor Margolis - 03 July 11:51

I feel like Tinder is a place where lesbians play badminton and drink iced tea, while straight women trawl through skips while dodging rotten turnips that are being lobbed at their heads.

Rolf Harris was convicted of 12 counts of assault. Photo: Getty
Rolf Harris guilty: but what has Operation Yewtree really taught us about sexual abuse?
By Bernard Gallagher - 01 July 11:22

As disturbing as they are, celebrity abuse cases are just a tiny subset of a much broader problem.

What is cyberbullying?
What is cyberbullying?
By Aoife Moriarty - 01 July 10:33

Cyberbullying became a major subject last year after a number of teen suicides linked to social network Ask.fm. But what is it, and how can we prevent young people from abusing each other online?

Rolf Harris arriving at Southwark Crown Court. Photo: Getty
Rolf Harris found guilty of indecent assault
By New Statesman - 30 June 15:08

The 84-year-old entertainer has been convicted of 12 attacks.

Students back the UCU marking boycott. Image: Vimeo
The student fight for all university staff to be paid a living wage
By Natasha Turner - 26 June 10:00

I believe it’s important that students uphold the employment standards that we would want to see for ourselves.

Full English: the MCC's chief executive (centre) and others at Lords 2011. Photo: Getty
I wear my egg-and-bacon tie with pride – MCC membership is my last link to civilisation
By Nicholas Lezard - 26 June 10:00

My politics may place me firmly on the left of Labour, but confess to owning an MCC tie and people start looking at you in a whole new light.

The England football team in Brazil. Photo: Getty
Who's to blame for England's failure at the World Cup? There's only one answer
By Phil Hartup - 24 June 18:27

... and it's not foreign players in the Premier League.

Playground for the rich: Tomson Golf Club in Shanghai. Photo: Alessandro Rizzi/Luz/Eyevine
The Chinese golf courses that don’t officially exist
By Simon Kuper - 20 June 12:00

The Forbidden Game uses golf – a game that most in the country probably still know nothing about – to gain a rare insight into ordinary Chinese lives. 

Photo: Getty
Is your GP a buzzer or a meeter? Sometimes, a diagnosis starts in the waiting room
By Phil Whitaker - 19 June 10:58

Sometimes, just going to greet a patient can make all the difference.

Lost in India: passengers on an Indian railway platform. Photo: Getty
Why did a man wake up on an Indian train platform with no idea who he was?
By Philip Maughan - 19 June 10:00

When David Stuart MacLean woke up in India with amnesia he assumed he was an addict who had overdosed. In fact, the only chemical he’d been taking was the prescribed antimalarial drug Lariam.  

These women like football. But it's OK if you don't. Photo: Getty
Women! If you don't like football, it's OK to say so
By Glosswitch - 18 June 15:15

Back in the 1990s, I used to pretend I liked football. Now I realise I had been taken in by the Football Mystique.

Technology can even free teachers from admin, leaving more time to devlote to pupils. Photo: Getty
The latest learning technology can raise standards of education for everyone
By Matthew Hancock - 18 June 12:25

To get the best out of it, investment in learning technology needs to be results driven.

Peggy Beaty as a maid in the play "The Five O'Clock Girl" in 1929. Photo: Sasha/Getty
Why I still tip a surly waitress after bad service
By Eleanor Margolis - 18 June 12:07

Refusal to massage every customer with niceness is, perhaps, a sort of personal strike. Why not support them by still giving a tip?

Luis Suarez and the Uraguay team train in Brazil ahead of the World Cup. Photo: Getty
My World Cup training is not going well but I am perked up by Uruguay’s most charming fan
By Hunter Davies - 13 June 11:48

In Sheffield, 96-year-old Tanya Schmoller will be cheering on Uruguay. After all, she attended the first ever World Cup finals, held in Uruguay in 1930.

Italy celebrate winning the World Cup in Berlin, July 2006. Photo: Getty
The last World Cup: after Brazil 2014, is the tournament finished?
By Jason Cowley - 13 June 10:00

Football is a supreme instrument of soft power and can unite people as little else can. But allegations of Fifa corruption have tarnished the image of the beautiful game. Can anything be done to save it?

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