The Greek Defense Industry Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2016

The situation has nearly escalated to an armed conflict twice, and is historically the driving factor behind Greek defense procurements. The country’s lack of domestic defense capabilities and the extensive capabilities of the Turkish military have driven Greece to procure sophisticated defense systems from foreign OEMs in order to strengthen the country’s strategic assets and protect critical infrastructure. During 2005–2010, Greece accounted for 4% of global arms imports, making it the fifth-largest arms importer globally.

Key Features and Benefits

• Provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2011 to 2016, including highlights of key growth stimulators. It also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

• Includes trend analysis of imports and exports, together with its implications and impact on the Greek defense industry.

• Covers five forces analysis to identify various power centers in the industry and how these are expected to develop in the future.

• Allows readers to identify possible ways to enter the market, together with detailed descriptions of how existing companies have entered the market, including key contracts, alliances and strategic initiatives.

• Helps the reader to understand the competitive landscape of the defense industry in Greece. It provides an overview of key defense companies, both domestic and foreign, together with insights such as key alliances, strategic initiatives and a brief financial analysis.

• Looks at historical performance as well as future industry projections using the in-house model. The report is a mixture of graphs, charts, tables and text in an effort to give the reader the maximum possible information in the most efficient and visually appealing manner.

• Helps marketing agencies in the industry to promote their business by aligning their capabilities and business practices with their customers’ changing needs, while it also helps suppliers to benchmark their efforts with those of their competitors.

• Uncovers the business outlook, key challenges and opportunities identified by suppliers and buyers, enabling industry stakeholders to understand the business sentiment prevailing in the industry.

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Lord Geoffrey Howe dies, age 88

Howe was Margaret Thatcher's longest serving Cabinet minister – and the man credited with precipitating her downfall.

The former Conservative chancellor Lord Howe, a key figure in the Thatcher government, has died of a suspected heart attack, his family has said. He was 88.

Geoffrey Howe was the longest-serving member of Margaret Thatcher's Cabinet, playing a key role in both her government and her downfall. Born in Port Talbot in 1926, he began his career as a lawyer, and was first elected to parliament in 1964, but lost his seat just 18 months later.

Returning as MP for Reigate in the Conservative election victory of 1970, he served in the government of Edward Heath, first as Solicitor General for England & Wales, then as a Minister of State for Trade. When Margaret Thatcher became opposition leader in 1975, she named Howe as her shadow chancellor.

He retained this brief when the party returned to government in 1979. In the controversial budget of 1981, he outlined a radical monetarist programme, abandoning then-mainstream economic thinking by attempting to rapidly tackle the deficit at a time of recession and unemployment. Following the 1983 election, he was appointed as foreign secretary, in which post he negotiated the return of Hong Kong to China.

In 1989, Thatcher demoted Howe to the position of leader of the house and deputy prime minister. And on 1 November 1990, following disagreements over Britain's relationship with Europe, he resigned from the Cabinet altogether. 

Twelve days later, in a powerful speech explaining his resignation, he attacked the prime minister's attitude to Brussels, and called on his former colleagues to "consider their own response to the tragic conflict of loyalties with which I have myself wrestled for perhaps too long".

Labour Chancellor Denis Healey once described an attack from Howe as "like being savaged by a dead sheep" - but his resignation speech is widely credited for triggering the process that led to Thatcher's downfall. Nine days later, her premiership was over.

Howe retired from the Commons in 1992, and was made a life peer as Baron Howe of Aberavon. He later said that his resignation speech "was not intended as a challenge, it was intended as a way of summarising the importance of Europe". 

Nonetheless, he added: "I am sure that, without [Thatcher's] resignation, we would not have won the 1992 election... If there had been a Labour government from 1992 onwards, New Labour would never have been born."

Jonn Elledge is the editor of the New Statesman's sister site CityMetric. He is on Twitter, far too much, as @JonnElledge.