The Greek Defense Industry Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2016

The situation has nearly escalated to an armed conflict twice, and is historically the driving factor behind Greek defense procurements. The country’s lack of domestic defense capabilities and the extensive capabilities of the Turkish military have driven Greece to procure sophisticated defense systems from foreign OEMs in order to strengthen the country’s strategic assets and protect critical infrastructure. During 2005–2010, Greece accounted for 4% of global arms imports, making it the fifth-largest arms importer globally.

Key Features and Benefits

• Provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2011 to 2016, including highlights of key growth stimulators. It also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

• Includes trend analysis of imports and exports, together with its implications and impact on the Greek defense industry.

• Covers five forces analysis to identify various power centers in the industry and how these are expected to develop in the future.

• Allows readers to identify possible ways to enter the market, together with detailed descriptions of how existing companies have entered the market, including key contracts, alliances and strategic initiatives.

• Helps the reader to understand the competitive landscape of the defense industry in Greece. It provides an overview of key defense companies, both domestic and foreign, together with insights such as key alliances, strategic initiatives and a brief financial analysis.

• Looks at historical performance as well as future industry projections using the in-house model. The report is a mixture of graphs, charts, tables and text in an effort to give the reader the maximum possible information in the most efficient and visually appealing manner.

• Helps marketing agencies in the industry to promote their business by aligning their capabilities and business practices with their customers’ changing needs, while it also helps suppliers to benchmark their efforts with those of their competitors.

• Uncovers the business outlook, key challenges and opportunities identified by suppliers and buyers, enabling industry stakeholders to understand the business sentiment prevailing in the industry.

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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.