Everything you wanted to know about One Billion Rising

Join this global movement on 14 February to end violence against women and girls.

What is it?

One Billion Rising has been described as a “feminist tsunami.” It is a movement for people across the world to rise up and demand an end to violence against women and girls.

One Billion Rising is:

  • A global strike
     
  • An invitation to dance
     
  • A call to men and women to refuse to participate in the status quo until rape and rape culture ends
     
  • An act of solidarity, demonstrating to women the commonality of their struggles and their power in numbers
     
  • A refusal to accept violence against women and girls as a given
     
  • A new time and a new way of being
     

The movement wants ending violence to be as important as ending poverty, AIDS or global warming.

When is it ?

Events will take place on the 14th February. This is the 15th anniversary of a global movement to end violence against women, V-Day. And also, of course, Valentines Day!

Why one billion?

One in three women on the planet will be beaten or raped in her lifetime. That is one billion women violated.

Where is it?

Nearly 190 countries are  taking part and 13,000 organisations are involved in organising events, making One Billion Rising the largest ever grassroots global movement for change. It aims to build worldwide solidarity, showing violence against women is not  a local issue or particular to any culture or religion or village or age.

Who is organising it?

The initiative is headed up by Eve Ensler, the creator of the Vagina Monologues and founder of V-Day. Ordinary people, activists, high profile supporters, civic leaders, and a wide range of grassroots and global organisations will all be taking part. From Norwich to Peru, through Bute, Manila and Luxembourg via San Francisco, Nigeria and Tel Aviv, activists are organising flashmobs, performances and seeking policy changes.

 

What can I do?
 

In the words of One Billion Rising, WALK OUT, DANCE, RISE UP, and DEMAND an end to this violence!

 

 

A group of women dance at a religious festival in India, Mark Kolbe, CREDIT: Getty Images
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Emmanuel Macron's "moralisation of politics" comes at a heavy price for his allies

"Fake" jobs in French politics, season 3 episode 1.

Something is rotten in the state of France. No political party – at least none that existed before 2016 – seems immune to the spread of investigations into “fake” or shady parliamentary jobs. The accusations sank centre-right candidate François Fillon’s presidential campaign, and led to Marine Le Pen losing her parliamentary immunity in the European parliament (and proxy wars within her party, the National Front). Both deny the allegations. Now the investigations have made their way to the French government, led by Edouard Philippe, Emmanuel Macron’s Prime Minister.

On Wednesday morning, justice minister François Bayrou and secretary of state for European affairs Marielle de Sarnez announced their resignation from Philippe’s cabinet. They followed defence minister Sylvie Goulard’s resignation the previous day. The three politicians belonged not to Macron's party, En Marche!, but the centrist MoDem party. Bayrou, the leader, had thrown his weight behind Macron after dropping his own presidential bid in April.

The disappearance of three ministers leaves Emmanuel Macron’s cross-party government, which includes politicians from centre left and centre right parties, without a centrist helm. (Bayrou, who has run several times for the French presidency and lost, is the original “neither left nor right” politician – just with a less disruptive attitude, and a lot less luck). “I have decided not to be part of the next government,” he told the AFP.

Rumours had been spreading for weeks. Bayrou, who was last part of a French government as education minister from 1993 to 1997, had been under pressure since 9 June, when he was included in a preliminary investigation into “embezzlement”. The case revolves around whether the parliamentary assistants of MoDem's MEPs, paid for by the European Parliament, were actually working full or part-time for the party. The other two MoDem ministers who resigned, along with Bayrou, also have assistants under investigation.

Bayrou has denied the allegations. He has declared that there “never was” any case of “fake” jobs within his party and that it would be “easy to prove”. All the same, by the time he resigned, his position as justice minister has become untenable, not least because he was tasked by Macron with developing key legislation on the “moralisation of politics”, one of the new President’s campaign pledges. On 1 June, Bayrou unveiled the new law, which plans a 10-year ban from public life for any politician convicted of a crime or offence regarding honesty and transparency in their work.

Bayrou described his decision to resign as a sacrifice. “My name was never pronounced, but I was the target to hit to attack the government’s credibility,” he said, declaring he would rather “protect this law” by stepping down. The other two ministers also refuted the allegations, and gave similar reasons for resigning. 

Macron’s movement-turned-unstoppable-machine, En Marche!, remains untainted from accusations of the sort. Their 350 new MPs are younger, more diverse than is usual in France – but they are newcomers in politics. Which is exactly why Macron had sought an alliance with experienced Bayrou in the first place.

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