Everything you wanted to know about One Billion Rising

Join this global movement on 14 February to end violence against women and girls.

What is it?

One Billion Rising has been described as a “feminist tsunami.” It is a movement for people across the world to rise up and demand an end to violence against women and girls.

One Billion Rising is:

  • A global strike
     
  • An invitation to dance
     
  • A call to men and women to refuse to participate in the status quo until rape and rape culture ends
     
  • An act of solidarity, demonstrating to women the commonality of their struggles and their power in numbers
     
  • A refusal to accept violence against women and girls as a given
     
  • A new time and a new way of being
     

The movement wants ending violence to be as important as ending poverty, AIDS or global warming.

When is it ?

Events will take place on the 14th February. This is the 15th anniversary of a global movement to end violence against women, V-Day. And also, of course, Valentines Day!

Why one billion?

One in three women on the planet will be beaten or raped in her lifetime. That is one billion women violated.

Where is it?

Nearly 190 countries are  taking part and 13,000 organisations are involved in organising events, making One Billion Rising the largest ever grassroots global movement for change. It aims to build worldwide solidarity, showing violence against women is not  a local issue or particular to any culture or religion or village or age.

Who is organising it?

The initiative is headed up by Eve Ensler, the creator of the Vagina Monologues and founder of V-Day. Ordinary people, activists, high profile supporters, civic leaders, and a wide range of grassroots and global organisations will all be taking part. From Norwich to Peru, through Bute, Manila and Luxembourg via San Francisco, Nigeria and Tel Aviv, activists are organising flashmobs, performances and seeking policy changes.

 

What can I do?
 

In the words of One Billion Rising, WALK OUT, DANCE, RISE UP, and DEMAND an end to this violence!

 

 

A group of women dance at a religious festival in India, Mark Kolbe, CREDIT: Getty Images
Getty
Show Hide image

On the "one-state" solution to Israel and Palestine, what did Donald Trump mean?

The US President seemed to dismantle two decades of foreign policy in his press conference with Benjamin Netanyahu. 

If the 45th President of the United States wasn’t causing enough chaos at home, he has waded into the world’s most intricate conflict – Israel/Palestine. 

Speaking alongside Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Trump made an apparently off-the-cuff comment that has reverberated around the world. 

Asked what he thought about the future of the troubled region, he said: “I’m looking at two-state and one-state and I like the one that both parties like.”

To the uninformed observer, this comment might seem fairly tame by Trump standards. But it has the potential to dismantle the entire US policy on the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. Trump said he could "live with" either a two-state or one-state solution. 

The "two-state solution" has become the foundation of the Israel-Palestine peace process, and is a concept that has existed for decades. At its simplest, it's the idea that an independent state of Palestine can co-exist next to an independent Israel. The goal is supported by the United Nations, by the European Union, by the Arab League, and by, until now, the United States. 

Although the two-state solution is controversial in Israel, many feel the alternative is worse. The idea of a single state would fuel the imagination of those on the religious right, who wish to expand into Palestinian territory, while presenting liberal Zionists with a tricky demographic maths problem - Arabs are already set to outnumber Jews in Israel and the occupied territories by 2020. Palestinians are divided on the benefits of a two-state solution. 

I asked Yossi Mekelberg, Professor of International Relations at Regent's University and an associate fellow at Chatham House, to explain exactly what went down at the Trump-Netanyahu press conference:

Did Donald Trump actually mean to say what he said?

“Generally with President Trump we are into an era where you are not so sure whether it is something that happens off the hoof, that sounds reasonable to him while he’s speaking, or whether maybe he’s cleverer than all of us put together and he's just pretending to be flippant. It is so dramatically opposite from the very professorial Barack Obama, where the words were weighted and the language was rich, and he would always use the right word.” 

So has Trump just ditched a two-state solution?

“All of a sudden the American policy towards the Israel-Palestine conflict, a two-state solution, isn’t the only game in town.”

Netanyahu famously didn’t get on with Obama. Is Trump good news for him?

“He was quite smug during the press conference. But while Netanyahu wanted a Republican President, he didn’t want this Republican. Trump isn’t instinctively an Israel supporter – he does what is good for Trump. And he’s volatile. Netanyahu has enough volatility in his own cabinet.”

What about Trump’s request that Netanyahu “pull back on settlements a little bit”?

“Netanyahu doesn’t mind. He’s got mounting pressure in his government to keep building. He will welcome this because it shows even Trump won’t give them a blank cheque to build.”

Back to the one-state solution. Who’s celebrating?

“Interestingly, there was a survey just published, the Palestinian-Israel Pulse, which found a majority of Israelis and a large minority of Palestinians support a two-state solution. By contrast, if you look at a one-state solution, only 36 per cent of Palestinians and 19 per cent of Israel Jews support it.”

 

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.