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The Week So Far

1. Europe
Financial sanctions against the Libyan defector Mousa Kousa were dropped on 4 April to encourage the defection of other high-profile Libyans. Kousa, who fled to Britain on 30 March, had his assets unfrozen, despite being wanted for questioning over his involvement in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing.

2. North America
President Barack Obama launched his re-election campaign on 4 April on Twitter, Facebook and Barackobama.com. Obama tweeted: "Today, we're filing papers to launch our 2012 campaign." It is estimated that it will cost more than $1bn.

3. Middle East
The UN investigator Richard Goldstone has distanced himself from a report into alleged Israeli war crimes during Israel's attack on Gaza in 2008. Goldstone wrote in a Washington Post op-ed: "If I had known then what I know now, the Goldstone report would have been a different document." The South African judge said that "civilians were not intentionally targeted as a matter of policy" by Israeli forces.

4. Latin America
A former carnival singer was elected president of Haiti after winning 68 per cent of the vote in a run-off election on 20 March. Michel Martelly, 50, also known as "Sweet Micky" or "Tet Kalé" (bald head), admits to having smoked marijuana and crack cocaine before he became a politician.

5. Africa
Prosecutors in Zambia have dropped charges against two Chinese managers who shot 13 coal miners in a wage protest in October last year. Critics claim that prosecutors dropped the charges in order to avoid damaging Chinese investment in the African state, which amounts to $1bn per year.

6. Asia
Floods in Thailand have killed 53 people and forced 40,000 to flee their homes. Unseasonably wet weather caused mudslides and flash-flooding, which swept away bridges, roads and buildings. The Thai government has pledged £120m to help flood victims.

7. Technology
Google has entered a $900m bid for the patent portfolio of the bankrupt Canadian telecoms company Nortel Networks. The bid focuses on Nortel's
6,000 technology patents and Google hopes that it will "create a disincentive" to sue the internet giant.

8. Health
People who work long hours are at greater risk of heart disease, according to UCL researchers. Those who work more than 11 hours a day run a 67 per cent higher risk than those working eight.

9. People
The late David Foster Wallace's unfinished novel, The Pale King, will be published on 15 April, the day US tax returns have to be filed. The novel is based on the lives of tax inspectors in Illinois.

10. Business
Four orders of nuns have called on Goldman Sachs executives to rein in excessive pay for the investment bank's executives. The Sisters of Saint Joseph of Boston, Notre Dame de Namur, St Francis of Philadelphia and the Benedictine Sisters of Mount Angel will issue the proposal at Goldman's forthcoming annual general meeting.

This article first appeared in the 11 April 2011 issue of the New Statesman, Jemima Khan guest edit

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The New Times: Brexit, globalisation, the crisis in Labour and the future of the left

With essays by David Miliband, Paul Mason, John Harris, Lisa Nandy, Vince Cable and more.

Once again the “new times” are associated with the ascendancy of the right. The financial crash of 2007-2008 – and the Great Recession and sovereign debt crises that were a consequence of it – were meant to have marked the end of an era of runaway “turbocapitalism”. It never came close to happening. The crash was a crisis of capitalism but not the crisis of capitalism. As Lenin observed, there is “no such thing as an absolutely hopeless situation” for capitalism, and so we discovered again. Instead, the greatest burden of the period of fiscal retrenchment that followed the crash was carried by the poorest in society, those most directly affected by austerity, and this in turn has contributed to a deepening distrust of elites and a wider crisis of governance.

Where are we now and in which direction are we heading?

Some of the contributors to this special issue believe that we have reached the end of the “neoliberal” era. I am more sceptical. In any event, the end of neoliberalism, however you define it, will not lead to a social-democratic revival: it looks as if, in many Western countries, we are entering an age in which centre-left parties cannot form ruling majorities, having leaked support to nationalists, populists and more radical alternatives.

Certainly the British Labour Party, riven by a war between its parliamentary representatives and much of its membership, is in a critical condition. At the same time, Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership has inspired a remarkable re-engagement with left-wing politics, even as his party slumps in the polls. His own views may seem frozen in time, but hundreds of thousands of people, many of them young graduates, have responded to his anti-austerity rhetoric, his candour and his shambolic, unspun style.

The EU referendum, in which as much as one-third of Labour supporters voted for Brexit, exposed another chasm in Labour – this time between educated metropolitan liberals and the more socially conservative white working class on whose loyalty the party has long depended. This no longer looks like a viable election-winning coalition, especially after the collapse of Labour in Scotland and the concomitant rise of nationalism in England.

In Marxism Today’s “New Times” issue of October 1988, Stuart Hall wrote: “The left seems not just displaced by Thatcherism, but disabled, flattened, becalmed by the very prospect of change; afraid of rooting itself in ‘the new’ and unable to make the leap of imagination required to engage the future.” Something similar could be said of the left today as it confronts Brexit, the disunities within the United Kingdom, and, in Theresa May, a prime minister who has indicated that she might be prepared to break with the orthodoxies of the past three decades.

The Labour leadership contest between Corbyn and Owen Smith was largely an exercise in nostalgia, both candidates seeking to revive policies that defined an era of mass production and working-class solidarity when Labour was strong. On matters such as immigration, digital disruption, the new gig economy or the power of networks, they had little to say. They proposed a politics of opposition – against austerity, against grammar schools. But what were they for? Neither man seemed capable of embracing the “leading edge of change” or of making the imaginative leap necessary to engage the future.

So is there a politics of the left that will allow us to ride with the currents of these turbulent “new times” and thus shape rather than be flattened by them? Over the next 34 pages 18 writers, offering many perspectives, attempt to answer this and related questions as they analyse the forces shaping a world in which power is shifting to the East, wars rage unchecked in the Middle East, refugees drown en masse in the Mediterranean, technology is outstripping our capacity to understand it, and globalisation begins to fragment.

— Jason Cowley, Editor 

Tom Kibasi on what the left fails to see

Philip Collins on why it's time for Labour to end its crisis

John Harris on why Labour is losing its heartland

Lisa Nandy on how Labour has been halted and hollowed out

David Runciman on networks and the digital revolution

John Gray on why the right, not the left, has grasped the new times

Mariana Mazzucato on why it's time for progressives to rethink capitalism

Robert Ford on why the left must reckon with the anger of those left behind

Ros Wynne-Jones on the people who need a Labour government most

Gary Gerstle on Corbyn, Sanders and the populist surge

Nick Pearce on why the left is haunted by the ghosts of the 1930s

Paul Mason on why the left must be ready to cause a commotion

Neal Lawson on what the new, 21st-century left needs now

Charles Leadbeater explains why we are all existentialists now

John Bew mourns the lost left

Marc Stears on why democracy is a long, hard, slow business

Vince Cable on how a financial crisis empowered the right

David Miliband on why the left needs to move forward, not back

This article first appeared in the 22 September 2016 issue of the New Statesman, The New Times