Bite-sized briefing: world

The Pakistani army continues its ground assault on the militant stronghold of South Waziristan, facing fierce resistance from the Taliban. Up to 100,000 civilians have fled the conflict zone. At least eight people died in a retaliation suicide attack on the International Islamic University in Islamabad. All schools and universities have been closed.

Iran has accused "the Great Satan America and its ally Britain" of supporting Sunni terrorist group Jundullah, after a suicide attack in the south-east of the country killed 42 people, including six senior commanders of the Revolutionary Guard. Britain and the US dismissed the claims.

Talks between Iran and world powers on a uranium enrichment deal stalled on the second day, when Iran suddenly announced that it would not deal directly with France, accusing it of reneging on contracts to deliver nuclear materials in the past. Talks later resumed.

Voters in Niger are electing new MPs after President Mamadou Tandja dissolved parliament in May for rejecting his bid to extend his stay in power. West Africa's trade grouping Ecowas has suspended Niger in response.

Thirty-four Kurdish separatist guerrillas surrendered to the Turkish army after crossing the border from their camp in Iraq. It's a symbolic gesture of rebel support for government plans to broaden Kurdish rights.

In Rio de Janeiro, 21 people died during two days of gang warfare which followed the death of three policemen when a police helicopter was shot down on 17 October. The violence has revived concerns over Rio's suitability to host the Olympic Games in 2016.

Iceland says it has come to a new agreement over the repayment of £3bn to the governments of the Netherlands and the UK, which paid the money out to the 400,000 savers affected when Icesave collapsed last year. Reykjavik hopes the agreement might ease the financial pressure it is under in the long term.

The Australian defence minister, John Faulkner, has asked for recommendations on how to complete operations in Afghanistan as early as possible, in the clearest signal so far that Australia may withdraw its 1,500 troops sooner than expected.

Somali pirates have hijacked a Chinese cargo ship with 25 crew on board. The De Xin Hai was seized between the Seychelles and Maldives, 700 miles east of Somalia's coast. China pledged an "all-out" rescue attempt.

The Afghan president, Hamid Karzai, faces a run-off against his main rival, Abdullah Abdullah, after a UN-backed panel said there was clear evidence of fraud in the first round of August's presidential elections. It will take place on 7 November.

Kyrgyzstan's government has announced its resignation in the wake of President Kurmanbek Bakiyev's call for sweeping reforms to increase
his own power.

Roman Polanski lost his appeal to be released on bail from a Swiss jail. The decision came as the film director faced possible extradition to the US over his 1977 conviction for unlawful sex with a 13-year-old girl.

The US Senate has voted to continue to allow Guantanamo Bay inmates to be tried on US soil, marking a modest victory in President Obama's efforts to close the camp.

Dozens of ethnic Uighurs have disappeared since being detained in the wake of riots in China's Xinjiang region, according to Human Rights Watch. The riots in early July left nearly 200 people dead.