This is not a real picture of today's eclipse. Photo: A4size-ska / DeviantArt
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This is not a picture of today's eclipse

Don't trust everything you read.

A total eclipse was visible from the UK today, for the first time since 1999. (And the last until the next one, due in 2090.) Many, many people are currently tweeting the above picture, claiming it's a picture taken by astronauts on the International Space Station.

Even New Scientist tweeted it (though they've now deleted that), and ITV posted it as well (before also deleting the page from their site). This is because it is obviously not real. It's a 2009 illustration by a DeviantArt user called A4size-ska.

There are two things that give this away. The first is the sheer unreality of it - it looks like CGI, and the spheres of the Moon and Sun are significantly larger than they truly appear from the Earth (or near the Earth). The shadow this eclipse casts is also stretched out, rather than a neat circle.

Secondly, we know what an eclipse looks like from space. It looks like this:

Photo: CNES

That's a picture of the shadow cast by the Moon on the Earth during the 11 August 1999 solar eclipse. It was taken by the crew of the Mir space station, during one of its last few missions before it was decommissioned and allowed to burn up and fall back to Earth in 2001.

However, it's understandable that some people might have reached for something a bit spectacular, as the view of the eclipse this morning for much of us in the UK (including from the NS offices) was this:

PS: A further public service announcement is necessary, to make clear you should ignore anything Ukip MEP Roger Helmer claims about climate change and/or the Sun, today or any day:

The man's a fool.

Ian Steadman is a staff science and technology writer at the New Statesman. He is on Twitter as @iansteadman.

Joshua M. Jones for Emojipedia
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The emojis proposed for release in 2016 are faintly disturbing

Birds of prey, dead flowers and vomit: Emojipedia's vision for 2016. 

Since, as we're constantly being told, emojis are now the fastest growing languge in the UK, it seems only appropriate that its vocabulary should expand to include more commonly used images or ideas as its popularity increases. 

Next year, the Unicode Consortium, which decides which new codes can be added to the emoji dictionary, will approve a new round of symbols. So far, 38 suggestions have been accepted as candidates for the final selection. Emojipedia, an online emoji resource, has taken it upon itself to mock up the new symbols based on the appearance of existing emojis (though emojis are designed slightly differently by different operating systems like Apple or Android). The full list will be decided by Unicode in mid-2016. 

As it stands, the new selection is a little... well, dark. 

First, there are the faces: a Pinocchio-nosed lying face, a dribbling face, a nauseous face, an upset-looking lady and a horrible swollen clown head: 

Then there's what I like to call the "melancholy nighttime collection", including a bat, owl, fox, blackened heart and dying rose: 

Here we have a few predators, thrown in for good measure, and a stop sign:

There are a few symbols of optimism amid the doom and gloom, including a pair of crossed fingers, clinking champagne glasses and smiling cowboy, plus a groom and prince to round out the bride and princess on current release. (You can see the full list of mock-ups here). But overall, the tone is remarkably sombre. 

Perhaps as emoji become ever more popular as a method of communication, we need to accept that they must represent the world in all its darkness and nuance. Not every experience deserves a smiley face, after all. 

All mock-ups: Emojpedia.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.