The Orion capsule at the head of Nasa's Delta IV rocket as it launched today. Image: Screenshot of Nasa live feed
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Orion, Nasa's next-gen Mars rocket, launches on first successful test flight

Major milestone passed as part of ongoing plan to land humans on Mars by 2030.

After being delayed for 24 hours by high wind speeds (and, at one point, a boat sailing beneath its intended flight path), a Delta IV rocket launched from Nasa's Cape Canaveral base in Florida today with an empty Orion capsule aboard. The mission - Exploration Flight Test One (EFT-1) - is the first major test of many more to come, as Nasa continues towards landing a human crew on Mars in 2030.

The Orion capsule represents the next generation of manned space flight from Nasa, which retired its Space Shuttle in 2011. Its design is similar to that of the famous Apollo missions - it sits above a large rocket, which burn through its fuel and falls away in stages until it deposits the capsule itself into orbit. It will spend 4.5 hours in space, loaded with sensors and ballast to mimic the weight of the astronauts and equipment that a future manned mission may carry, but the mission for today is to simply survive two orbits of Earth, one of which will loop up through the Van Allen Belt with a peak altitude of nearly 6,000km, and back again for splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

Getting through the Van Allen Belt safely is one of the mission's main objectives. It's the band of radiation - from the solar wind and from cosmic rays - trapped by the Earth's magnetic field, like iron filings scattered on a piece of paper lying on top of a bar magnet, and it poses a huge risk to any craft which sails through it, from satellites to rockets and everything in between. The sensors aboard Orion will be hoping to find that the radiation shielding on the capsule works as planned to protect both all of its electronic instruments and any future travellers aboard.

The data from today's mission will go towards the next one, planned for three years from now. By then, Orion will be carried by Nasa's next-generation rocket: the Space Launch System, a rocket even more powerful than the Delta IV (which is itself about ten years old, and insufficient for the kinds of missions Nasa's planning for). The Delta IV manages 700,000 lbs of thrust; the SLS will manage as much as ten times that, while being capable of lifting a payload of more than 130 tonnes to low-Earth orbit compared to the Delta IV's 26 tonnes.

The return to a capsule and rocket system instead of a reusable shuttle is for a good reason - we know it works in getting human crews to other worlds, and the modules can withstand much higher speeds on re-entry into the atmosphere when returning. And the similarities between Orion and the SLS to the Apollo spacecraft and its Saturn V lifter go beyond the practical, since this system is being designed to give Nasa the ability to take humans beyond mere low-Earth orbit and on to other worlds for years to come. An eventual mission to Mars in 2030 - landing a crew and then returning them, unlike some of the more outlandish colonisation schemes currently being hatched - will only happen if the other steps along the way go smoothly.

That means getting some humans safely into orbit and back again on a test flight sometime around 2021, and also achieving other goals throughout the course of the decade. That includes another Moon landing, a mission to intercept an asteroid as it passes Earth and study it, and even a mission to one of Mars' moons Phobos and Deimos. These missions will be taking place in conjunction with other unmanned ones, like the rover planned as the successor to Curiosity that will land on Mars in 2020 - it'll be able to test some of the technologies that, it's hoped, will ensure that astronauts who land there will be able to survive and return safely.

All of that is in the future, however, and thus contingent on the United States government still giving a damn about space exploration enough over the course of the next decade and a half. Space exploration is prestigious, but doing it with humans is extraordinarily expensive - and our ability to study the Solar System with robots has come on in leaps and bounds since Apollo. We no longer have to put humans inside spaceships because we can't make computers as smart as human brains, as small as human brains. Who knows if putting humans inside Orion will look a boondoggle or not to the scientists, or public, of 2030?

Ian Steadman is a staff science and technology writer at the New Statesman. He is on Twitter as @iansteadman.

Curtis Holland
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Living the Meme: What happened to the "Bacon is good for me" boy?

Eight years after becoming a meme, the boy dubbed "King Curtis" explains what life is like now.

It is hard to pinpoint the one quote that made Curtis Holland a viral sensation. When he appeared on Wife Swap eight years ago, Holland – aka King Curtis – battled ferociously with his replacement mum Joy, who wanted to rid his home of unhealthy snacks. “Chicken nuggets is like my family,” he said at one point; “I don’t wanna be skinny! I wanna be fat and happy,” he said at another; during one particularly memorable scene he wrote “I am not lisning to your rules” on a Post-It note.

“Bacon is good for me!” perhaps comes out top. The quote – like all the others – has become an internet meme, featured in screenshots and gifs, but has additionally been remixed into a song. The original clip has over ten million views on YouTube. Now aged 15, Holland is speaking to me from his home in Vanceboro, North Carolina. “Oh yes!” he says when I ask if he still likes bacon. “Every morning my mum gets up and we all cook bacon together.”

 

Before speaking to Holland, I had eaten (ten) chicken nuggets for my tea, but when I tell him this I'm not sure he believes me. “I know some people say this just to say it,” he says, before admitting he himself had eaten some that day. “This morning that's exactly what I had.”

Holland speaks in a straightforward matter-of-fact tone that is just as endearing now as it was when he was seven. He is incredibly respectful – calling me “ma’am” at least three times – and is patient when I struggle to decipher his thick Southern accent (“pennies” for example, becomes “pinnies”, “cars” is “curs”).

“We live in a small community, and a lot of people say that I'm the movie star,” says Holland, when I ask him to explain how life has changed since appearing on TV. When I ask about life after becoming a meme, Holland is less sure. “I mean I don't have a Twitter but a lot of people say that I'm up there just about every week,” he says (in reality, the clip of his appearance alone – never mind gifs, quotes or screenshots – is tweeted multiple times a day).

There is one meme moment, however, that Holland definitely didn’t miss. In 2015, Pretty Little Liars actress Lucy Hale posted a photo to Instagram asking for an update on his life. In response, Holland created a YouTube video asking for money to rebuild cars and confidently saying “Someday I’ll get my own bacon brand.” The video got over 400,000 views.

“I went viral for I think three or four days and I was on the most views on YouTube,” explains Holland. “That was pretty cool for me, to see when I look on YouTube there my face is.” How did it make him feel, I ask? “It makes you feel good inside. One day I come home from school and I was mad, and I can tell you it just made me feel really good inside to see that [the video] was pretty much one of the top in basically the world.”

Despite enjoying the attention, Holland has no aspirations to be a TV or internet star again. He is part of an organisation called the Future Farmers of America (FFA), and plans to go to his local community college before becoming a welder. “There’s a few know-it-alls in the community,” he says, “They just say it’s crazy how you went and did all that and now you’re not going on in the movie field. That’s not something I’m really interested in.”

Yet although Holland says it’s “time to move on a little bit”, he also admits he would be open to any offers. “A lot of people say well why don’t you just get up with a bacon company and do commercials or something… I mean I wouldn’t mind doing that if they came and asked me.” After Wife Swap, a company did come and film a pilot for Holland’s own show, but it never amounted to anything. “I mean you'd be lucky to get on TV once in your whole life and I feel like I really enjoyed it when I was up there,” he says when I ask if this was disappointing.

All of this means that Holland hasn’t made much money from his viral fame. Unlike other memes I’ve spoken to, he hasn’t earned hundreds of thousands of dollars. “I believe I got 150 bucks,” he says of his “Update” YouTube video, “All the other stuff like the ‘Bacon is good for me’ songs, they’ve [the creators] made $75,000 and that’s a lot of money putting away."

“I mean it don’t annoy me because it ain’t my fault; it’s nobody’s fault in the situation. They found a way around the system,” he says when I ask if he’s annoyed at others’ making money at his expense.

Nowadays, Holland is still recognised when he is out and about, and says he has signed over one thousand autographs in his life (once he was wary of a neighbourhood policeman who was asking him to sign a parking ticket, before he realised he simply wanted an autograph). “I don’t get sick of it, but of course you’ve got a few people that want to be rude about what you’re doing.

“I really don’t care, I’m a really upbeat kind of person. If there's somebody in a computer screen telling me something that means nothing, you know?”

For Holland, then, the good outweighs the bad. Apart from being asked after by Lucy Hale, his favourite thing about going viral is that he gets to make people laugh. “If I can go up to somebody and make their day and make them smile, I feel like I’ve done a great thing,” he says.

I end the interview with Holland like I end all of my interviews with memes: by asking him if there’s anything he would like to say – a message he’d like to get out there, or a misconception he’d like to clear up – now that he has the chance.

“Oh nothing I've got to say,” he begins, “except bacon is still good for me.”

 “Living the Meme” is a series of articles exploring what happens to people after they go viral. Check out the previous articles here.

To suggest an interviewee for Living the Meme, contact Amelia on Twitter.

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.