Crackdown on Golden Dawn: Michaloliakos charged with belonging to a criminal organisation

Party leader, Nikolaos Michaloliakos, was arrested yesterday together with four more Golden Dawn MPs and 15 party members in an unprecedented crackdown on Greece's far-right party

The leader of Greece’s far-right Golden Dawn party, Nikolaos Michaloliakos, has been formally charged with belonging to a criminal organisation. Michaloliakos was arrested yesterday together with four more Golden Dawn MPs and 15 party members. Police have said they found weapons, ammunition and thousands of euros cash at Michaeloliakos’s home.

The Golden Dawn arrests followed public demonstrations over the stabbing of Pavlos Fyssas, an anti-racist rapper, on 18 September. The man held for the stabbing said he was a member of Golden Dawn, something the party has denied. Yesterday, a public prosecutor accused the far-rightists of murder, extortion and money laundering.

These arrests mark an unprecedented crackdown on the far-right group that has long been accused of violence against immigrants and leftist political opponents, including an attack on Communist Party members earlier this month that hospitalised nine people. The arrests were welcomed as "a historic day for Greece and Europe" by the public order minister, Nikos Dendias.

The ultimate test, however, will be how the courts now respond. This isn’t the first time leading Golden Dawn members have been charged over violence, but as New Statesman’s Yiannis Baboulias reports, Greek’s judicial system has consistently failed to prosecute party members and has neglected to protect witnesses from intimidation.

Golden Dawn currently has 18 MPs in Greece’s parliament, and their MPs won’t lose their seats or political rights until a final court ruling is heard on their cases. This Friday, however, Golden Dawn threatened to pull its 18 MPs out of parliament, which would spark by-elections.

 

Golden Dawn party members staging a demonstration outside their party HQ. Photo: Getty.

Sophie McBain is a freelance writer based in Cairo. She was previously an assistant editor at the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Donald Trump's inauguration signals the start of a new and more unstable era

A century in which the world's hegemonic power was a rational actor is about to give way to a more terrifying reality. 

For close to a century, the United States of America has been the world’s paramount superpower, one motivated by, for good and for bad, a rational and predictable series of motivations around its interests and a commitment to a rules-based global order, albeit one caveated by an awareness of the limits of enforcing that against other world powers.

We are now entering a period in which the world’s paramount superpower is neither led by a rational or predictable actor, has no commitment to a rules-based order, and to an extent it has any guiding principle, they are those set forward in Donald Trump’s inaugural: “we will follow two simple rules: hire American and buy American”, “from this day forth, it’s going to be America first, only America first”.

That means that the jousting between Trump and China will only intensify now that he is in office.  The possibility not only of a trade war, but of a hot war, between the two should not be ruled out.

We also have another signal – if it were needed – that he intends to turn a blind eye to the actions of autocrats around the world.

What does that mean for Brexit? It confirms that those who greeted the news that an US-UK trade deal is a “priority” for the incoming administration, including Theresa May, who described Britain as “front of the queue” for a deal with Trump’s America, should prepare themselves for disappointment.

For Europe in general, it confirms what should already been apparent: the nations of Europe are going to have be much, much more self-reliant in terms of their own security. That increases Britain’s leverage as far as the Brexit talks are concerned, in that Britain’s outsized defence spending will allow it acquire goodwill and trade favours in exchange for its role protecting the European Union’s Eastern border.

That might allow May a better deal out of Brexit than she might have got under Hillary Clinton. But there’s a reason why Trump has increased Britain’s heft as far as security and defence are concerned: it’s because his presidency ushers in an era in which we are all much, much less secure. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.