Crackdown on Golden Dawn: Michaloliakos charged with belonging to a criminal organisation

Party leader, Nikolaos Michaloliakos, was arrested yesterday together with four more Golden Dawn MPs and 15 party members in an unprecedented crackdown on Greece's far-right party

The leader of Greece’s far-right Golden Dawn party, Nikolaos Michaloliakos, has been formally charged with belonging to a criminal organisation. Michaloliakos was arrested yesterday together with four more Golden Dawn MPs and 15 party members. Police have said they found weapons, ammunition and thousands of euros cash at Michaeloliakos’s home.

The Golden Dawn arrests followed public demonstrations over the stabbing of Pavlos Fyssas, an anti-racist rapper, on 18 September. The man held for the stabbing said he was a member of Golden Dawn, something the party has denied. Yesterday, a public prosecutor accused the far-rightists of murder, extortion and money laundering.

These arrests mark an unprecedented crackdown on the far-right group that has long been accused of violence against immigrants and leftist political opponents, including an attack on Communist Party members earlier this month that hospitalised nine people. The arrests were welcomed as "a historic day for Greece and Europe" by the public order minister, Nikos Dendias.

The ultimate test, however, will be how the courts now respond. This isn’t the first time leading Golden Dawn members have been charged over violence, but as New Statesman’s Yiannis Baboulias reports, Greek’s judicial system has consistently failed to prosecute party members and has neglected to protect witnesses from intimidation.

Golden Dawn currently has 18 MPs in Greece’s parliament, and their MPs won’t lose their seats or political rights until a final court ruling is heard on their cases. This Friday, however, Golden Dawn threatened to pull its 18 MPs out of parliament, which would spark by-elections.

 

Golden Dawn party members staging a demonstration outside their party HQ. Photo: Getty.

Sophie McBain is a freelance writer based in Cairo. She was previously an assistant editor at the New Statesman. She is on Twitter as @SEMcBain.

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David Cameron: "Taking more and more refugees" is not the answer to the migration crisis

As the migrant crisis worsens, the Prime Minister refuses to allow desperate people into Britain, citing "peace" in the Middle East as his priority.

David Cameron says "taking more and more refugees" is not the answer to the global migration crisis.

Amid calls for the UK to allow more people in, to help ease the record numbers of migrants entering Europe and to provide asylum for desperate people attempting to cross the border, the Prime Minister insists upon keeping the UK's doors closed.

Preferring to focus on the situation in the Middle East, Cameron commented:

We are taking action across the board... the most important thing is to try to bring peace and stability to that part of the world . . . I don't think there is an answer that can be achieved simply by taking more and more refugees.

His words come on the day that harrowing photos of a young Syrian boy, washed up dead on a beach near the Turkish resort of Bodrum, have been published. The child was from a group of 12 Syrian refugees who drowned attempting to reach Greece.

The Labour leadership candidates are taking a different stance. In a much-praised speech this week, Yvette Cooper urged the UK to take in 10,000 more refugees, warning that a failure to do so would be, “cowardly, immoral and not the British way”.

Andy Burnham too has called for Britain to take more people in (or, in his words, "share the burden"): "This is a humanitarian crisis, not just a tedious inconvenience for British holidaymakers, as our government might have us believe."

Now read this week's leader on the migration crisis, "The wretched of the earth", calling for the UK to accept more asylum seekers

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.