JK Rowling really was outed as "Robert Galbraith" against her will

Conspiracists, back down: this wasn't a publisher-organised PR coup.

Since the world learned that JK Rowling had written a crime novel under the name "Robert Galbraith", conspiracy theories have been flying.

Some pointed to the fact that the Daily Mail had reviewed it as evidence that Rowling wasn't being treated like a real debut author (despite the fact that the other two books reviewed that day are a debut print book and a debut crime novel); others have argued that the fact that the book is back in stock so quickly means the publishers were in on the unmasking, with stocks standing by; still more have pointed to the massive sales boost after her name came out as evidence of… something (This despite the fact that if Rowling's only aim was to sell millions of copies, she could just have put her name on the book). Even more people haven't quite articulated what conspiracy they're alleging, but just feel that she can't have really wanted to be anonymous, and there must be some secret plan involved.

Well, if there was a plan involved, it's more tortuous than even David Icke could handle. The leak came via Rowling's solicitors, Russells. The Bookseller reports the firm's statement:

We, Russells Solicitors, apologise unreservedly for the disclosure caused by one of our partners, Chris Gossage, in revealing to his wife’s best friend, Judith Callegari, during a private conversation that the true identity of Robert Galbraith was in fact J K Rowling.

Whilst accepting his own culpability, the disclosure was made in confidence to someone he trusted implicitly. On becoming aware of the circumstances, we immediately notified JK Rowling’s agent.  We can confirm that this leak was not part of any marketing plan and that neither J K Rowling, her agent nor publishers were in any way involved.

Callegari then apparently tweeted the fact to Sunday Times journalist India Knight, and the whole thing spiralled from there. The tweet, along with Callegari's entire Twitter account, has now been deleted.

If people really want to continue criticising Rowling, they have avenues left open – yes, those who knew who she was probably gave her more attention than they would a real first-time novelist – but there's little doubt left that her "experiment" really was in good faith. "JK Rowling" is a name which carries a sales boost and a critical penalty.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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