JK Rowling really was outed as "Robert Galbraith" against her will

Conspiracists, back down: this wasn't a publisher-organised PR coup.

Since the world learned that JK Rowling had written a crime novel under the name "Robert Galbraith", conspiracy theories have been flying.

Some pointed to the fact that the Daily Mail had reviewed it as evidence that Rowling wasn't being treated like a real debut author (despite the fact that the other two books reviewed that day are a debut print book and a debut crime novel); others have argued that the fact that the book is back in stock so quickly means the publishers were in on the unmasking, with stocks standing by; still more have pointed to the massive sales boost after her name came out as evidence of… something (This despite the fact that if Rowling's only aim was to sell millions of copies, she could just have put her name on the book). Even more people haven't quite articulated what conspiracy they're alleging, but just feel that she can't have really wanted to be anonymous, and there must be some secret plan involved.

Well, if there was a plan involved, it's more tortuous than even David Icke could handle. The leak came via Rowling's solicitors, Russells. The Bookseller reports the firm's statement:

We, Russells Solicitors, apologise unreservedly for the disclosure caused by one of our partners, Chris Gossage, in revealing to his wife’s best friend, Judith Callegari, during a private conversation that the true identity of Robert Galbraith was in fact J K Rowling.

Whilst accepting his own culpability, the disclosure was made in confidence to someone he trusted implicitly. On becoming aware of the circumstances, we immediately notified JK Rowling’s agent.  We can confirm that this leak was not part of any marketing plan and that neither J K Rowling, her agent nor publishers were in any way involved.

Callegari then apparently tweeted the fact to Sunday Times journalist India Knight, and the whole thing spiralled from there. The tweet, along with Callegari's entire Twitter account, has now been deleted.

If people really want to continue criticising Rowling, they have avenues left open – yes, those who knew who she was probably gave her more attention than they would a real first-time novelist – but there's little doubt left that her "experiment" really was in good faith. "JK Rowling" is a name which carries a sales boost and a critical penalty.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.