Manufacturing gets less bad across Europe

Indicators show slowing rate of decline in industry.

Some surprisingly decent manufacturing data has been release this morning, for both the UK and Europe. The purchasing managers' indices (PMIs) for May, which survey a cross-section of companies on their business in the sector to provide an indication of activity in the sector, showed improvement in Spain, Italy and France, as well as in the Eurozone as a whole.

A value of below 50 indicates contraction in the sector, while a value of above 50 indicates expansion; the magnitude of the difference reflects the speed of the change. So a rise from 45 to 48, for instance, would represent a sector still contracting, but doing so slower than it had been before.

In the UK, the sector looks to be growing at the faster rate for 14 months, with a value of 51.3. The both exports and domestic orders contributed, although the latter was the main driver.

UK manufacturing PMI

In Spain, the PMI hit a two-year high, of 48.1; in Italy, it hit a four-month high of 47.3; and in France, it reached a 13-month high of 46.4. All of those values still represent contraction, but contraction at a slower rate than there has been for a while. Combined with the secular trend against manufacturing, that's nothing to be sniffed at.

In the Eurozone overall, the PMI is at its highest for 15 months, although only just. It's still not good news, as such – not a single nation covered is actually growing – but it's still hopeful:

The German PMI signalled the slowest rate of contraction overall and moved close to the stabilisation level as output and new orders both rose for the first time in three months. Downturns in the Netherlands and Austria were also only moderate.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Appreciate the full horror of Nigel Farage's pro-Trump speech

The former Ukip leader has appeared at a Donald Trump rally. It went exactly as you would expect.

It is with a heavy heart that I must announce Nigel Farage is at it again.

The on-again, off-again Ukip leader and current Member of the European Parliament has appeared at a Donald Trump rally to lend his support to the presidential candidate.

It was, predictably, distressing.

Farage started by telling his American audience why they, like he, should be positive.

"I come to you from the United Kingdom"

Okay, good start. Undeniably true.

"– with a message of hope –

Again, probably quite true.

Image: Clearly hopeful (Wikipedia Screenshot)

– and optimism.”

Ah.

Image: Nigel Farage in front of a poster showing immigrants who are definitely not European (Getty)

He continues: “If the little people, if the real people–”

Wait, what?

Why is Trump nodding sagely at this?

The little people?

Image: It's a plane with the name Trump on it (Wikimedia Commons)

THE LITTLE PEOPLE?

Image: It's the word Trump on the side of a skyscraper I can't cope with this (Pixel)

THE ONLY LITTLE PERSON CLOSE TO TRUMP IS RIDING A MASSIVE STUFFED LION

Image: I don't even know what to tell you. It's Trump and his wife and a child riding a stuffed lion. 

IN A PENTHOUSE

A PENTHOUSE WHICH LOOKS LIKE LIBERACE WAS LET LOOSE WITH THE GILT ON DAY FIVE OF A PARTICULARLY BAD BENDER

Image: So much gold. Just gold, everywhere.

HIS WIFE HAS SO MANY BAGS SHE HAS TO EMPLOY A BAG MAN TO CARRY THEM

Image: I did not even know there were so many styles of Louis Vuitton, and my dentists has a lot of old copies of Vogue.

Anyway. Back to Farage, who is telling the little people that they can win "against the forces of global corporatism".

 

Image: Aaaaarggghhhh (Wikipedia Screenshot)

Ugh. Okay. What next? Oh god, he's telling them they can have a Brexit moment.

“... you can beat Washington...”

“... if enough decent people...”

“...are prepared to stand up against the establishment”

Image: A screenshot from Donald Trump's Wikipedia page.

I think I need a lie down.

Watch the full clip here:

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland