Osborne lashes himself to the mast ahead of Q4 GDP figures

Prepared for the worst.

George Osborne, addressing attendees of the World Economic Forum in Davos, promised to ignore the recommendations of the IMF and carry on with austerity even if the GDP figures for the fourth quarter of 2012 — due to be released today — are negative.

The Financial Times reports that:

He repeated past comments that the economy was “walking a difficult road, but heading in the right direction”.

That "difficult road" is an increasingly lonely one. The IMF's chief economist, Oliver Blanchard, warned yesterday that a slow start to 2013 would be a good hint that the chancellor ought to "tone down" attempts to reduce the deficit with haste.

Meanwhile, it is widely expected that the UK will lose its AAA credit rating with at least one of the major ratings agencies. The agencies, while mainly reactionary in how they decide ratings, were frequently cited by Osborne as arbiters of financial responsibility in the first years of his chancellorship. Losing their backing would be a blow.

The range of forecasts for the figures out today spreads from -0.5 to +0.2 per cent. We shall find out the truth in two hours.

Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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LISTEN: Boris Johnson has a meltdown in car crash interview on the Queen’s Speech

“Hang on a second…errr…I’m sorry, I’m sorry.”

“Hang on a second,” Boris Johnson sighed. On air, you could hear the desperate rustling of his briefing notes (probably a crumpled Waitrose receipt with “crikey” written on it) and him burbling for an answer.

Over and over again, on issues of racism, working-class inequality, educational opportunity, mental healthcare and housing, the Foreign Secretary failed to answer questions about the content of his own government’s Queen’s Speech, and how it fails to tackle “burning injustices” (in Theresa May’s words).

With each new question, he floundered more – to the extent that BBC Radio 4 PM’s presenter Eddie Mair snapped: “It’s not a Two Ronnies sketch; you can’t answer the question before last.”

But why read your soon-to-be predecessor’s Queen’s Speech when you’re busy planning your own, eh?

Your mole isn’t particularly surprised at this poor performance. Throughout the election campaign, Tory politicians – particularly cabinet secretaries – gave interview after interview riddled with gaffes.

These performances were somewhat overlooked by a political world set on humiliating shadow home secretary Diane Abbott, who has been struggling with ill health. Perhaps if commentators had less of an anti-Abbott agenda – and noticed the car crash performances the Tories were repeatedly giving and getting away with it – the election result would have been less of a surprise.

I'm a mole, innit.

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