ONS reports that ONS actually quite good at estimating GDP

Estimates rarely change that much, but have got worse since the crash.

A new study by the ONS (pdf) on the practice of revising quarterly GDP reveals that, despite some high-profile revisions, they are actually doing pretty well.

The current practice for GDP figures is to release a preliminary estimate 25 days after the quarter ends, then update it for a second estimate a month later, and release a final estimate shortly before the next quarter ends – before starting the whole process again. Even after the "final" estimate is made, there's the possibility of still more releases:

As further data become available there are potential revisions to the quarterly GDP figures in subsequent QNA releases, as well as in the annual national accounts Blue Book publication.

The Blue Book process enables annual data to be balanced at a much more detailed level and is also the opportunity for major methodological changes to be introduced.

Whenever the preliminary estimate delivers surprising news – as it did with the most recent results – there is always a rush to point out that these estimates are usually revised (as indeed they are). But the overall picture remains remarkably accurate. The following chart compares the GDP growth given in the initial estimate to the final estimate given five years later.


There are some pretty large changes month-to-month, but only one revision in the last 20 years which changed the big picture in any substantial way (the near-collapse in growth in early 1998 actually appears not to have occurred).

Even when the whole period is covered, the authors conclude:

In broad terms the picture of growth in GDP over the period from 1961 to 2012 quarter two is similar, irrespective of the maturity of data, although there are some exceptions. In particular the differences caused by revisions in the late 1980s were previously discussed in Brown et al, where a period of consistent upward revisions led to the Pickford Review (1989). The review implemented a number of methodological changes including the publication of a single measure of GDP.

But what about the most recent period of recession and recovery?Has the ONS got worse at making those initial estimates due to the changed economic circumstances?


The below chart shows the absolute revisions to GDP estimates in the first two years. The Pickford review of 1989, which changed the methodology substantially, clearly worked, reducing the mean revision from a change of at least 0.5 points to one of barely 0.2 points. But while there was a period of unprecedented accuracy in the late 1990s and early 2000s, things have got marginally worse recently – even while staying significantly better than they had been two decades before.


As a result, the review concludes that:

There is some evidence that in the latest periods, the size of revision has increased [although not significantly]. . .

It is possible that the assumptions and methods underpinning the early estimates of GDP may not be as robust in periods of greater volatility or at turning points in the economy as they were during the long period of stability from 1992 to 2007.

The most important thing to note, however, is that there is no significant trend for the direction of the revision. Although it's usually positive, it hasn't been recently:


So if you are hoping that a GDP estimate will be revised, be careful what you wish for – it may not go the way you hope.

GDP percentage growth, quarter on same quarter 1 year ago - estimates.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.