Landmark pork deal between UK and China.

China agrees £50m trade deal with UK.

The UK will be able to start exporting pig meat to China, the world's biggest pork market, under a new £50m trade deal.

The ailing UK industry is to start exporting trotters, offal and other parts of the pig that are popular in China but less so in Britain.

The deal has been five years in the making, and talks over lamb and beef are expected to begin soon.

British pig farmers and adjacent industries have been struggling amid constraints by retailers who are trying to push prices lower. The size of the industry has halved in the last 10 years.

Chinese famers can sell pigs for twice as much as British farmers, partly because the "fifth quarter" - the tail, ears and trotters - are eaten, partly because pork is much more popular in China, and partly because the supermarkets have not yet started to squeeze Chinese food producers.

China consumes half the world's pig meat, and demand is growing. It is likely that China will not be able to produce its own supplies in the future.

Photograph: Getty Images
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.