No matter the political situation, it's always the economics that triumphs in the end. Photo: Getty
The best currency for an independent Scotland would be Norway’s kronor
By Piotr Marek Jaworski - 18 June 17:10

If Scotland votes for independence, it will create a completely different economic context for the two new countries that emerge.

Housing in south London seen from above. Photo: Getty
Five signs the London property bubble is reaching unsustainable proportions
By Ed Conway - 03 April 9:27

It's not difficult to see that London is facing a house price bubble. It's harder to say when it might pop.

Is pay going up or down? Both, or neither, depending on the measure you use. Photo: Getty
Pay set is to go up, or down, or stay the same – it all depends on how you measure it

We are heading into a so-called “living standards election” – without accurate data on living standards. Different sides will be able to tell whatever story they want.

Pensions minister Steve Webb. Photo: Getty
How are the government going to build a pension system that works?
By David Pitt-Watson - 02 April 12:27

Most people want to “give their money away to someone whom they can trust will use it wisely to generate a income when they retire”.

We need not fear him. Photograph: Getty Images.
Learning to live with machines
By Raphael Gray - 26 March 11:30

We need to take the idea of a universal basic income seriously.

Protestors against the £9,000 tuition fees outside the University of London in 2010. Photo: Getty
Student loans policy likely to cost more than the system it replaced – how could they be so wrong?
By Pam Tatlow - 21 March 17:06

Tripling fees to £9,000 was a clever exercise in smoke and mirrors accounting. Students and universities are paying the price.

Janet Yellen and Christine Lagarde.
Don't be mislead by the poor data, the US economy is still in rude health
By Nick Beecroft - 24 February 12:19

While current storms will weigh upon February’s statistics, Q2 growth could now hit 4 per cent and US rates could move significantly higher along the curve.

The disused Battersea Power station - an iconic London landmark. Photo: Getty
Exclusive, insensitive and architecturally uninspiring – the new age of urban regeneration
By Philip Kleinfeld - 17 February 10:47

The redevelopment of Battersea Power Station and the Nine Elms area in south London illustrates a much wider problem in the way cities are managed and planned – councils seem perfectly happy to see private interests direct the course of historically interesting places.

At the US Federal Reserve, when is a threshold not a threshold? When it's an embarrassment
By Nick Beecroft - 11 February 13:17

The Federal Open Market Committee is keen to hold fund rates in spite of falling unemployment. It's the first act of a newer, stricter committee.

Applauding the return to economic growth is like celebrating the release of an innocent prisoner
By Dom Boyle - 10 February 16:46

Nobody doubted a return to growth under austerity was possible - but all the evidence suggests it has been hampered by George Osborne's radically anti-stimulus position.

While Ukraine's political situation remains uncertain, its economy teeters on the brink
By Elizabeth Stephens - 07 February 15:50

If the political instability is not reined in soon enough, the currency will spiral out of control.

Staying power: the seemingly exceptional economics of Japan
By Felix Martin - 06 February 6:02

2013 was the year the world’s financial markets suddenly became interested in Japan again.

The 50p tax isn't going to greatly enrich the treasury - but private pensions will
By Stewart Cowley - 05 February 11:08

Ed Balls's 50p tax is nothing but theatrical politics - pay close attention to the Lifetime Allowance, the cap on pension funds, which has already been lowered and most likely will be again.

Five questions answered on longest real wages drop for 50 years
By Heidi Vella - 31 January 13:42

How long have real wages been dropping?

Where are Britain's selfless billionaires?
By Jonn Elledge - 28 January 14:50

Rich people in other countries demand they be required to pay higher taxes more often than you might think. So why doesn't Britain have a Warren Buffett or a Bill Gates, willing to pay a little bit more tax for everybody's benefit?

Will the MINT countries become the best place in the world to become a millionaire?
By Oliver Williams - 24 January 17:32

Economist Jim O'Neil has grouped Mexico, India, Nigeria and Turkey together as the economies most likely to explode over the next decade. But there are lessons to be learned from the BRICs - a rising tide does not lift all boats.

Alistair Darling.
Pegging electoral success to the economy is a risky business - as Alex Salmond is finding out
By Stewart Cowley - 21 January 15:16

The emotive, victory-clutching style of the Yes campaign is at risk of floundering before the cool, hard realities presented by the UK Treasury.

Elvetham Heath.
Five questions answered on the rise in UK home sales
By Heidi Vella - 17 January 18:00

Is this trend set to continue?

 Lofoten.
The sale of oil and gas has been highly lucrative for Norway - but should it continue?
By Ruby Lott-Lavigna - 17 January 17:41

The Scandinavian giant has kept itself afloat amid economic turbulence with a steady flow of natural resources - but is this nature-loving nation prepared to promote growth at all costs?

Janet Yellen.
What Janet Yellen and Mark Carney could learn from macroeconomist Hyman Minsky
By Stewart Cowley - 08 January 12:16

Gordon Brown, as Chancellor in the UK, and the Federal Reserve’s Alan Greenspan, notably, violated Minsky’s ideas - what will the new twin peaks of global finance do differently?

UNAM.
Our economy would benefit from sending students to study abroad
By Luis Juste - 03 January 15:31

Britain reaps the benefits of welcoming overseas students to study in the UK - but internationalism works both ways. We should also be enabling UK students to study abroad.

Labour challenges Cameron's Help to Buy boasts with call for more housebuilding
By George Eaton - 02 January 8:41

While the PM hails figures showing 750 homes have already been bought under the scheme, Labour remains focused on increasing building from its post-war low.

The UK won't become Europe's biggest economy if we slash immigration
By George Eaton - 26 December 12:24

The Tories are hailing the UK's projected growth while promoting policies that would strangle it.

We are re-living a traditional Victorian Christmas – of excess for the few and struggle for the many
By Duncan Exley - 23 December 16:00

The rich are getting richer to an extent that is breaking our society – and our economy – apart.

Why it’s misguided to treat the eurozone crisis as a morality tale about “lazy” southerners
By Mehdi Hasan - 09 December 14:19

As southern European countries rack up record debts, Helmut Kohl has told friends “Merkel is destroying my Europe”.

Do economists ever get it right?
By George Economides and Thomas Moutos - 08 December 8:46

There is one example when they did . . .

George Osborne's Autumn Statement: 10 things to look out for
By George Eaton - 05 December 9:19

Including, when will living standards start to rise, will there be new money for the NHS and how much more austerity is Osborne planning?

George Osborne.
Osborne and Carney should enjoy their day in the sun
By Nick Beecroft - 04 December 12:59

The UK fast becoming a stand-out developed economy performer. Growth is heading into 2014 at a healthy 3 to 4 per cent, even in the face of Osborne’s austerity.

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