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Jacob Blessing the Sons of Joseph by Rembrandt, Museumslandschaft Hessen Kassel, Germany
Man in the mirror: Rembrandt: the Late Works at the National Gallery
By Michael Prodger - 18 November 17:21

In later life the painter turned away from the light and towards himself.

Shopping for the few: signage in a branch of Waitrose. Photo: George Redgrave/Flickr
The place for rudeness is not in an anonymous letter but the queue in Waitrose
By Nicholas Lezard - 14 November 16:02

Nicholas Lezard’s weekly column, Down and Out. 

A photograph by Garry Winogrand, New York, 1955. Photo: The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Recalling Winograndia: Garry Winogrand's camera captured post-war America like few others
By Oliver Farry - 14 November 13:54

In Paris, the first retrospective of Winogrand's photography for 25 years mines the huge collection of unpublished material in his archives to produce an unprecedented narrative of his career that plays out like a Hollywood biopic.

In the Frame: Monty
By Tom Humberstone - 14 November 10:28

Tom Humberstone's weekly comic.

Ready Freddie? Mercury wows Madison Square Gardens in a blaze of light, 1977
Who wants to live forever? The new frontiers of posthumous rock
By Kate Mossman - 14 November 10:23

In the next two decades there’ll be a mass departure of the people who brought us the best of rock’n’roll, but some bands are finding new ways to give their tunes eternal life.

Fade to grey: Warhol's Marilyn Diptych (1962). Image © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London
Death and dollar signs: Warhol’s memory capsules of 20th-century America
By Mark Lawson - 14 November 10:18

Mark Lawson’s Critic’s Notes.

Dodgy pair: Gillian Anderson and Paul Spector in The Fall
Flirting with the enemy: The Fall’s baffling mission to make murder sexy
By Rachel Cooke - 13 November 16:48

The Fall continues to be shot through with imagery that subtly (and often not so subtly) connects violence against women with sex.

Heavy-handed treatment: Benedict Cumberbatch is Alan Turing in The Imitation Game
Computer says no: How has The Imitation Game managed to make Alan Turing’s story so dull?
By Ryan Gilbey - 13 November 16:39

The way Turing’s story is told is comparable to the montage in Big Brother when Davina McCall told evictees: “Let’s have a look at your best bits.” The Imitation Game is Alan Turing’s best bits.

Life Itself.
Life Itself, the new Roger Ebert documentary, shows just how important a critic can be
By Ryan Gilbey - 13 November 13:22

Nineteen months after his death in April 2013, a new documentary tells the story of Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert - his bravery in the face of illness, and his uniquely democratic approach to cinema.

After Copernicus
By Olivia Byard - 13 November 10:00

After such a hellish catastrophe,
what happens to the angels?

Inspiring: Malala Yousafzai speaks at the Forbes Under 30 Summit in Philadelphia on 21 October. Photo: Getty
Hear their voices: a choral celebration of Malala Yousafzai
By Caroline Crampton - 13 November 10:00

Young British composer James McCarthy and Pakistani writer Bina Shah have collaborated to produce Malala, a dramatic work for choir and orchestra that attempts to capture the spirit of her story.

Better with age: Arjen Robben, who used to play for Chelsea, now at Bayern Munich. Photo: Getty
They may be foreign players, but they’re our foreign players
By Hunter Davies - 13 November 10:00

Hunter Davies’s weekly football column, The Fan.

Strange alliance: Ferrante's Neopolitan novels tell of a decades-long friendship between two women. Photo: Chloe Edwards/Millennium Images UK
In her secret life: who exactly is Elena Ferrante?
By Jane Shilling - 13 November 10:00

As Ferrante’s writing became conspicuous, so did her anonymity. Speculation gathered, not just about her identity but even her sex.

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