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SRSLY #3: Sense8 and Sensibility

In this week’s episode, we discuss Arnold Schwarzenegger, the new Netflix series Sense8 and why we wish Rookie magazine had existed when we were teenagers.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online. Listen to our new episode now:

...or subscribe in iTunes. We’re also on Audioboom, Stitcher, RSS and  SoundCloud – but if you use a podcast app that we’re not appearing in, let us know.

SRSLY is hosted by Caroline Crampton and Anna Leszkiewicz, the NS’s web editor and editorial assistant. We’re on Twitter as @c_crampton and @annaleszkie, where between us we post a heady mixture of Serious Journalism, excellent gifs and regularly ask questions J K Rowling needs to answer. The podcast is also on Twitter @srslypod if you’d like to @ us with your appreciation. More info and previous episodes on newstatesman.com/srsly.

We had two guests this week. First we were joined by NS sub-editor Yo Zushi, who is on Twitter @YoZushi81. You can read his writing for the NS here. Also appearing was the author and campaigner Caroline Criado-Perez. She is on Twitter @ccriadoperez. She also writes for the NS here.

If you’d like to talk to us about the podcast or make a suggestion for something we should read or cover, you can email srslypod[at]gmail.com. You can also find us on Twitter @srslypod, or send us your thoughts on tumblr here. If you like the podcast, we'd love you to leave a review on iTunes - this helps other people come across it.

 

The Links

On Arnie:

Yo's piece is here.

Here's the trailer for Terminator Genisys:

 

On Sense8:

This is the trailer for Sense8:

The whole series is available on Netflix.

The Guardian's catch up blog on the series makes some interesting points about the way different characters were used (and underused).

Wired's Geek's Guide to the Galaxy podcast talked about the show's queer themes and the way different critics have reacted to the diversity of its cast.

Bram E Gieben at io9 points out the parallels with Philip K Dick.

This roundup of the ten most ludicrous moments from the series is also good.

 

On Rookie:

This week, Caroline read Rookie for the first time. She particularly enjoyed this piece about masturbation, this coming out story, and this article about eyebrows.

For next week, Anna is watching Masters of Sex. If you'd like to watch too in preparation for next week's episode, there are lots of clips on the show's YouTube channel or you can get full episodes on iTunes.

 

Your questions:

It was really exciting to hear from some of our listeners - if you have thoughts you want to share on anything we've discussed, or questions you want to ask us, please email us on srslypod[at]gmail.com, or @ us on Twitter @srslypod, or get in touch via tumblr here.

 

Our theme music is “Guatemala - Panama March” (by Heftone Banjo Orchestra), licensed under Creative Commons.

See you next week!

PS If you missed episode two, check it out here.

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Why a Keeping Up with the Kardashians cartoon would make genuinely brilliant TV

The Kardashians are their own greatest satirists.

You’ve seen Keeping Up with the Kardashians, Kourtney and Kim Take Kyoto, and Kylie and Kendall Klarify Kommunications Kontracts, but the latest Kardashian show might take a step away from reality. Yes, Kartoon Kardashians could be on the way. According to TMZ, an animated cartoon is the next Kardashian television property we can expect: the gossip website reports that Kris Jenner saw Harvey Weinstein’s L.A. production company earlier this month for a pitch meeting.

It’s easy to imagine the dramas the animated counterparts of the Kardashians might have: arguments over who gets the last clear plastic salad bowl? Moral dilemmas over whether or not to wear something other than Balenciaga to a high profile fashion event? Outrage over the perceived betrayals committed by their artisanal baker?

If this gives you déjà vu, it might be because of a video that went viral over a year ago made using The Sims: a blisteringly accurate parody of Keeping Up with the Kardashians that sees the three sisters have a melodramatic argument about soda.

It’s hysterical because it clings onto the characteristics of the show: scenes opening with utter banalities, sudden dramatic music coinciding with close-ups of each family member’s expressions, a bizarre number of shots of people who aren’t speaking, present tense confessionals, Kim’s ability to do an emotional 0-60, and Kourtney’s monotonous delivery.

But if the Kardashians, both as a reality TV show and celebrity figures, are ripe for ridicule, no one is more aware of it than the family themselves. They’ve shared teasing memes and posted their own self-referential jokes on their social channels, while Kim’s Kimoji app turned mocking viral pictures into self-depreciating in-jokes for her fans. And the show itself has a level of self-awareness often misinterpreted as earnestness - how else could this moment of pure cinema have made it to screen?

The Kardashians are their own greatest satirists, and they’ve perfected the art of making fun of themselves before anyone else can. So there’s a good chance that this new cartoon won’t be a million miles away from “Soda Drama”. It might even be brilliant.

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.