Amadeus, amadeus: a Mozart score. Photo: AFP.
Show Hide image

Going off script: on a new Radio 4 programme, even reading Mozart's scores proves entrancing

Tales from the Stave and The Film Programme on BBC Radio 4.

Tales from the Stave; The Film Programme
BBC Radio 4

A new series of the brilliant Tales from the Stave – “examining the process of creation through handwritten manuscripts of the world’s greatest pieces of music” – began by looking at Mozart’s Requiem (21 February, 3.30pm). The composer’s original score is dated 1792, which was the year after his death. So, how come? Because several other people subsequently had their pen on it. And yet enough of Mozart’s own pencil-strokes exist to see how he worked and what he wanted for the piece.

Much of the show sounded like some marvellous, loopy, impressionistic response to the markings by various commentators and musicians, each talking off the top of his or her head in front of the document – in effect translating. “Those rather serpentine basset horns weaving in and out of each other like fish down a stream . . .” muttered the music scholar Nigel Simeone, while the singer Jette Engelke hummed along over his shoulder. “Those markings there,” someone cried, “that say sotto voce! That’s a very romantic marking to put on a score . . .” The magical emergence of the shape of the Mass had everyone sort of drunk.

A similar buzz came a few days later on The Film Programme (26 February, 4pm) when the Brando biographer Susan L Mizruchi spoke about the actor’s work on scripts, having had access for the first time to his personal copies, which he had kept in an unlovely shed in his Mulholland Drive garden. Unique among his biographers, Mizruchi has charted Brando’s own painstaking markings and amendments.

It made me pick up her (wonderful) book again. What an ingenious reviser of dialogue Brando was! Here’s a good one: where in Mario Puzo’s script the Don says to the Undertaker at the start of The Godfather, “Why are you afraid to give your first allegiance to me?” Brando confidently amends his own script (and croons on screen): “Bonasera, bonasera [sic], what have I ever done to make you treat me so disrespectfully?” Mozart and Brando, their pencils and manuscripts, their talent and brilliance. Their greatness: the one quality distinct from any other, that conceals, as they did, all the scribbles and amendments. Conceals everything, in fact – that’s what greatness does. 

Antonia Quirke is an author and journalist. She is a presenter on The Film Programme and Pick of the Week (Radio 4) and Film 2015 and The One Show (BBC 1). She writes a column on radio for the New Statesman.

This article first appeared in the 27 February 2015 issue of the New Statesman, Russia vs the west

Getty
Show Hide image

Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Karen Bradley as Culture Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

The most politically charged of the culture minister's responsibilities is overseeing the BBC, and to anyone who works for - or simply loves - the national broadcaster, Karen Bradley has one big point in her favour. She is not John Whittingdale. Her predecessor as culture secretary was notorious for his belief that the BBC was a wasteful, over-mighty organisation which needed to be curbed. And he would have had ample opportunity to do this: the BBC's Charter is due for renewal next year, and the licence fee is only fixed until 2017. 

In her previous job at the Home Office, Karen Bradley gained a reputation as a calm, low-key minister. It now seems likely that the charter renewal will be accomplished with fewer frothing editorials about "BBC bias" and more attention to the challenges facing the organisation as viewing patterns fragment and increasing numbers of viewers move online.

Of the rest of the job, the tourism part just got easier: with the pound so weak, it will be easier to attract visitors to Britain from abroad. And as for press regulation, there is no word strong enough to describe how long the grass is into which it has been kicked.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.