"Elizabeth Bishop: Petropolis, Brazil, 1952": a poem by Blake Morrison

My toucan is flourishing, now he takes cold baths:
he plunges in as though he hates it but knows he must.
Once wet, his skin goes the colour of blueberries
or as if he’s wearing jeans. I’ve a cat now, too,
black with a white bib, perfect evening wear for the opera.
The house is under a cliff, and I’ve my own studio.
I am so high here, so high. Clouds spill over the mountains
like waterfalls in slow motion, then float into my bedroom.
No one can tell me what day it is, or even the time of year,
all I know is it’s the season of blue butterflies.
I am learning Portuguese, which is packed with diminutives –
buttonholes are buttonhouses. I’ve bought an MG,
with red leather seats, which my story in the New Yorker
will pay for once they stop demanding changes –
one tires of typing even a masterpiece.
The fireflies move with milky blue lights, like distant trains.
We go to bed at 9.30 and read, surrounded by oil-lamps.
Apart from my asthma, and an allergy to cashews,
I feel better than I have for years. I know it’s a cliché
but Brazilians really are (which I love them for) crazy.

This poem, part of a longer sequence, is a collage of words and images that Elizabeth Bishop used in her letters. Blake Morrison and Ali Smith will discuss Bishop’s time in Brazil at the Cambridge Literary Festival on 5 April (cambridgeliteraryfestival.com; 01223 300 085).

This article first appeared in the 10 April 2014 issue of the New Statesman, Tech Issue

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Katy Perry just saved the Brits with a parody of Donald Trump and Theresa May

Our sincerest thanks to the pop star for bringing one fleeting moment of edge to a very boring awards show.

Now, your mole cannot claim to be an expert on the cutting edge of culture, but if there’s one thing we can all agree on in 2017, it’s that the Brit Awards are more old hat than my press cap. 

Repeatedly excluding the genres and artists that make British music genuinely innovative, the Brits instead likes to spend its time rewarding such dangerous up-and-coming acts as Robbie Williams. And it’s hosted by Dermot O’Leary.

Which is why the regular audience must have been genuinely baffled to see a hint of political edge entering the ceremony this year. Following an extremely #makeuthink music video released earlier this week, Katy Perry took to the stage to perform her single “Chained to the Rhythm” amongst a sea of suburban houses. Your mole, for one, doesn’t think there are enough model villages at popular award ceremonies these days.

But while Katy sang of “stumbling around like a wasted zombie”, and her house-clad dancers fell off the edge of the stage, two enormous skeleton puppets entered the performance in... familiar outfits.

As our Prime Minister likes to ask, remind you of anyone?

How about now?

Wow. Satire.

The mole would like to extend its sincerest lukewarm thanks to Katy Perry for bringing one fleeting moment of edge to one of the most vanilla, status-quo-preserving awards ceremonies in existence. 

I'm a mole, innit.