Seamus Heaney dies aged 74

The Irish poet and Nobel laureate has died.

The poet Seamus Heaney has died aged 74. He had recently suffered from ill health, the BBC has reported.

Heaney, who won many awards over the course of his career, including the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995 and the T S Eliot Prize in 2006, is considered by many to be one of the foremost Irish poets of the last century. In 2009, the critic John Sutherland dubbed Heaney "the greatest poet of our age". Heaney's work, including poems like "Digging" from the 1966 collection Death of a Naturalist and his translation of Beowulf, is well-known and loved around the world, having appeared on many school exam syllabuses. 

Reviewing Heaney's 2010 collection Human Chain for the New Statesman, Jeremy Noel-Tod wrote that:

Like Cowper, Heaney is a reflective, rural poet, moving easily between man and landscape and finding a moral in any humble object. Again like Cowper, his characteristic style gently ironises poetry's grand manner with conversational self-consciousness and modest domesticity. Memorable as many of Heaney's lines are, it is hard to imagine anyone being driven wild by their beauty. It is poetry that "cheers but not inebriates" - as Cowper said of his cup of tea.

Seamus Heaney at the Hay Festival in 2006. Photo: Getty

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

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Katy Perry just saved the Brits with a parody of Donald Trump and Theresa May

Our sincerest thanks to the pop star for bringing one fleeting moment of edge to a very boring awards show.

Now, your mole cannot claim to be an expert on the cutting edge of culture, but if there’s one thing we can all agree on in 2017, it’s that the Brit Awards are more old hat than my press cap. 

Repeatedly excluding the genres and artists that make British music genuinely innovative, the Brits instead likes to spend its time rewarding such dangerous up-and-coming acts as Robbie Williams. And it’s hosted by Dermot O’Leary.

Which is why the regular audience must have been genuinely baffled to see a hint of political edge entering the ceremony this year. Following an extremely #makeuthink music video released earlier this week, Katy Perry took to the stage to perform her single “Chained to the Rhythm” amongst a sea of suburban houses. Your mole, for one, doesn’t think there are enough model villages at popular award ceremonies these days.

But while Katy sang of “stumbling around like a wasted zombie”, and her house-clad dancers fell off the edge of the stage, two enormous skeleton puppets entered the performance in... familiar outfits.

As our Prime Minister likes to ask, remind you of anyone?

How about now?

Wow. Satire.

The mole would like to extend its sincerest lukewarm thanks to Katy Perry for bringing one fleeting moment of edge to one of the most vanilla, status-quo-preserving awards ceremonies in existence. 

I'm a mole, innit.