Seamus Heaney dies aged 74

The Irish poet and Nobel laureate has died.

The poet Seamus Heaney has died aged 74. He had recently suffered from ill health, the BBC has reported.

Heaney, who won many awards over the course of his career, including the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995 and the T S Eliot Prize in 2006, is considered by many to be one of the foremost Irish poets of the last century. In 2009, the critic John Sutherland dubbed Heaney "the greatest poet of our age". Heaney's work, including poems like "Digging" from the 1966 collection Death of a Naturalist and his translation of Beowulf, is well-known and loved around the world, having appeared on many school exam syllabuses. 

Reviewing Heaney's 2010 collection Human Chain for the New Statesman, Jeremy Noel-Tod wrote that:

Like Cowper, Heaney is a reflective, rural poet, moving easily between man and landscape and finding a moral in any humble object. Again like Cowper, his characteristic style gently ironises poetry's grand manner with conversational self-consciousness and modest domesticity. Memorable as many of Heaney's lines are, it is hard to imagine anyone being driven wild by their beauty. It is poetry that "cheers but not inebriates" - as Cowper said of his cup of tea.

Seamus Heaney at the Hay Festival in 2006. Photo: Getty

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Karen Bradley as Culture Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

The most politically charged of the culture minister's responsibilities is overseeing the BBC, and to anyone who works for - or simply loves - the national broadcaster, Karen Bradley has one big point in her favour. She is not John Whittingdale. Her predecessor as culture secretary was notorious for his belief that the BBC was a wasteful, over-mighty organisation which needed to be curbed. And he would have had ample opportunity to do this: the BBC's Charter is due for renewal next year, and the licence fee is only fixed until 2017. 

In her previous job at the Home Office, Karen Bradley gained a reputation as a calm, low-key minister. It now seems likely that the charter renewal will be accomplished with fewer frothing editorials about "BBC bias" and more attention to the challenges facing the organisation as viewing patterns fragment and increasing numbers of viewers move online.

Of the rest of the job, the tourism part just got easier: with the pound so weak, it will be easier to attract visitors to Britain from abroad. And as for press regulation, there is no word strong enough to describe how long the grass is into which it has been kicked.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.