Judges for the 15th Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction announced

Lord Martin Rees to chair the Prize.

The judges for the 15th annual Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction have been announced. Chaired by Lord Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal, the panel includes Director of Liberty Shami Chakrabarti, Professor of Classics Mary Beard, author and editor James McConnachie and Professor of Contemporary British History and former journalist Peter Hennessy.

Rees who calls this his “dream team” has said: “I'm delighted and honoured to be chairing such a distinguished panel in the year of the fifteenth anniversary of the UK’s premier non-fiction prize.”

The panel will produce a shortlist in October and announce the winner of the £20,000 award on 4th November.

Won by Into the Silence by Wade Davis last year, the prize has previously been awarded to among others Stalingrad by Antony Beevor, 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare by James Shapiro and Nothing to Envy: Real Lives in North Korea by Barbara Demick.

Deadline for the competition is 28 June 2013. Publishers may submit up to three books with publication dates between 10 November 2012 and 31 December 2013. More information can be found here.

Dr Johnson. Photo by Rischgitz/Getty Images.
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"Samphire": a poem by Alison Brackenbury

"Yet how it waved, in coast’s late light. . . ."

My grandmother could cook it, for
she grew up by that dangerous shore
where the sea skulked without a wall

where I have seen it, tough as grass,
where silent men with rods trooped past
its salty ranks, without a glance.

Lear’s gatherer hangs perilously.
Why? So much is closed to me.
Did Shakespeare ever hear the sea?

Once, said my father, far inland,
from friend or stall, one clutch was found,
steamed, in my grandmother’s great pan.

Once, a smooth leaflet from a shop
claimed they could “source it”, but they stocked
bunched, peppered cress – Another gap.

Yet how it waved, in coast’s late light,
stalks I will never taste, could make
tenderly dark, my coast’s sly snake,
salt on my tongue, before I wake.

Alison Brackenbury is an award-winning poet. Her ninth collection, Skies, will be published by Carcanet in March

This article first appeared in the 11 February 2016 issue of the New Statesman, The legacy of Europe's worst battle