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He wakes up kicking.
A masterful restoration pulls visitors deep into Goya's haunted thoughts
By Michael Prodger - 13 March 13:11

Goya is better known for his portraiture and group paintings. But a restoration of the artist's private notebooks show a different side, where ghosts and witches abound in profoundly unnerving sketches.

A more modest view of Aidan Turner.
Second helpings: even with its sea vistas and a firm, pink bottom, Poldark fails to shine
By Rachel Cooke - 12 March 16:15

The new Poldark looks like a tourist board campaign for Cornwall, only with stagecoaches where there should be surfboards.

A commercial film set. Photo: David McNew/Getty Images
"We don't have a British film industry": The Business of Film takes us behind the movie scenes
By Antonia Quirke - 12 March 16:13

A new BBC Radio 4 three-part series covers all aspects of the industry.

The author Sir Terry Pratchett, who was an inspiration to many. Photo: Oli Scarff/Getty
Terry Pratchett: Ten best quotes
By Stephen Bush and Stephanie Boland - 12 March 16:04

“Do you not know that a man is not dead while his name is still spoken?” Following Terry Pratchett's death, here are some of his best quotations as chosen by the New Statesman team. 

If you think Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines plagiarises Marvin Gaye, you don't understand songwriting
By Rhodri Marsden - 12 March 14:35

A jury's view that Robin Thicke and Pharrell’s Blurred Lines copied Marvin Gaye’s 1977 song, Got To Give It Up is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of what songwriting is.

Mr Songbird: Ray Davies at the Flask pub in Highgate, north London, 1972. PHoto: Gijsbert Hankeroot/Redferns
The Kinks frontman Ray Davies: an imprisoned rock legend or just plain mean?
By Mark Ellen - 12 March 10:40

The title of veteran rock writer Johnny Rogan's biography Ray Davies: a Complicated Life may be something of an understatement.

Care in the community: Williams in 1985. Photo: Mark Gerson/National Portrait Gallery, London.
Raymond Williams was one of the left's great thinkers - he deserves to be rediscovered
By Geoff Dyer - 12 March 10:31

A hero of the 1968 generation, Raymond Williams was inextricably linked to where he came from and common experience. In an era of diluted politics, it's time to return to his work.

Gotcha! Steve Jobs speaks at an Apple music event in 2010. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
A modern history of hoaxes: without pranks, there'd be no Apple
By Robert Twigger - 11 March 17:30

From Bansky to Martin Bell, Kembrew McLeod's Pranksters: Making Mischief in the Modern World shows how pranks shake things up.

Derek Jacobi and Anne Reid in “Last Tango in Halifax”. Photo: BBC
Sally Wainwright: There’s no such thing as “northern comedy”
By Caroline Crampton - 11 March 13:41

The writer of such “northern” hits as Last Tango in Halifax and Happy Valley explains why she finds such categorisation redundant.

Is the gender gap in earnings the product of "rational" inequality? Picture: Hulton Archive
Much of women's work is unpaid - but without it, the economy would crumble
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 11 March 11:32

Katrine Marçal's Who Cooked Adam Smith's Dinner? reminds us how Homo economicus has always been supported by free, underacknowldged, female labour.

Girls on film: it's time to celebrate women critics, the liveliest voices in cinema
By Ryan Gilbey - 11 March 11:31

Why has it taken us so long to realise that the strongest, most exciting voices, shaping our opinions of cinema are women?

HaLOL: can the UK have a laugh about Islam?
By Anoosh Chakelian - 10 March 15:39

The Comedy Store in London held a rare showcase of Muslim comedians this week, who gave sharp insights into navigating Islam in the UK.

Critical Distance: This Week in Videogame Blogging #9
By Critical Distance - 10 March 10:41

On the 'cool gamer girlfriend'.

From brutalism to Borgen to blogging: how the language of cities has changed
By Oliver Farry - 09 March 13:45

Do you speak urbanism? The way we read and write in the language of cities has transformed.

Miranda July. Photo: Elizabeth Weinberg/The New York Times/Redux/Eyevine
Miranda July's debut novel The First Bad Man is a bittersweet tale of love, strangeness and cruelty
By Hannah Rosefield - 09 March 10:43

Like Ben Lerner and Sheila Heti, Miranda July has written a novel exploring new forms of love and community.

Leslee Udwin, the documentary-maker whose film, India's Daughter, has been censored on the sub-continent. (Photo:Getty)
The attitudes expressed towards women in India's Daughter are chilling. But they're also universal
By Emily Dyer - 08 March 7:50

India's Daughter has exposed that country's rape culture. But don't imagine that these attitudes aren't found around the world. 

Desiree Akhavan and Rebecca Henderson in Appropriate Behaviour. Photo: Peccadillo Pictures
More Annie Hall than Girls, Appropriate Behaviour pulses with emotion
By Ryan Gilbey - 06 March 11:36

Writer and director Desiree Akhavan has created an authentic, relatable story – with a heroine we hope will triumph.

In the Frame: Old media kneels before new media
By Tom Humberstone - 06 March 10:29

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Digital hieroglyphics: what does the buffer symbol tell us about ourselves?
By Thomas McMullan - 06 March 9:42

Staring at a buffer symbol, waiting for something on the internet to load can be both reassuring and distressing. We wait with the belief that something is happening out of sight.

How the impressionists found a new way of capturing the remarkable in everyday life
By Craig Raine - 05 March 11:51

Some think of the impressionists as the painterly equivalent of easy listening. Inventing Impressionism, themed around the collection of Paul Durand-Ruel, shows just how wrong they are.

Julianne Moore won the Best Actress Oscar for Still Alice.
Selective memory: why does Still Alice pull so many punches?
By Ryan Gilbey - 05 March 11:41

Clever pacing and Julianne Moore's Oscar-winning performance can't disguise the hedged bets and risks not taken.

Elaine Paige. Photo: China Photos/Getty Images
It's only natural: what's shaken the dust from Elaine Paige?
By Antonia Quirke - 05 March 11:35

The new Carole King musical - apparently.

Power couple Claire (Robin Wright) and Frank (Kevin Spacey)
Fifty shades of greige: the crumbling House of Cards shows the perils of repeat commissions
By Rachel Cooke - 05 March 11:33

Season three of House of Cards reaps diminishing returns.

Tim McMullan (Mendoza) & Ralph Fiennes (John Tanner). Photo: Johan Persson/National Theatre
George Bernard Shaw and David Hare: the political theatre that gets better with age
By Mark Lawson - 05 March 11:21

George Bernard Shaw's Man and Superman and David Hare's The Absence of War have an ideology that speaks to today's politics.

Do it for the vine. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Nip across the border to sample the ancient vines
By Nina Caplan - 05 March 9:31

Spain and Portugal may have settled their differences, but when it comes to grapes, it's not so simple.

The famous pebble beach at Llandudno, Wales. Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
In praise of meaningless work
By Joe Keohane - 04 March 12:00

We are all alienated labour now.

Latitude 2014. Photo: Carys Lavin
Latitude Festival announces 2015 line-up: alt-J, Portishead, Noel Gallagher
By New Statesman - 03 March 12:03

The music and arts festival reveals this year's line-up.

Alan Bennett is right: if you consult the literature, hypocrisy is a very English tradition
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 03 March 11:30

Alan Bennett's statement that the English excel at hypocrisy has upset the national press. But he's got literature on his side.

No one was “gay” in the 18th century: why we must not rewrite history with today’s terms
By Claire Hayward - 02 March 12:58

The danger of using current terminology and identities when discussing the past, especially marginalised and oppressed pasts, is that it results in bad history.

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