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Shopping for the few: signage in a branch of Waitrose. Photo: George Redgrave/Flickr
The place for rudeness is not in an anonymous letter but the queue in Waitrose
By Nicholas Lezard - 14 November 16:02

Nicholas Lezard’s weekly column, Down and Out. 

A photograph by Garry Winogrand, New York, 1955. Photo: The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Recalling Winograndia: Garry Winogrand's camera captured post-war America like few others
By Oliver Farry - 14 November 13:54

In Paris, the first retrospective of Winogrand's photography for 25 years mines the huge collection of unpublished material in his archives to produce an unprecedented narrative of his career that plays out like a Hollywood biopic.

In the Frame: Monty
By Tom Humberstone - 14 November 10:28

Tom Humberstone's weekly comic.

Ready Freddie? Mercury wows Madison Square Gardens in a blaze of light, 1977
Who wants to live forever? The new frontiers of posthumous rock
By Kate Mossman - 14 November 10:23

In the next two decades there’ll be a mass departure of the people who brought us the best of rock’n’roll, but some bands are finding new ways to give their tunes eternal life.

Dodgy pair: Gillian Anderson and Paul Spector in The Fall
Flirting with the enemy: The Fall’s baffling mission to make murder sexy
By Rachel Cooke - 13 November 16:48

The Fall continues to be shot through with imagery that subtly (and often not so subtly) connects violence against women with sex.

Heavy-handed treatment: Benedict Cumberbatch is Alan Turing in The Imitation Game
Computer says no: How has The Imitation Game managed to make Alan Turing’s story so dull?
By Ryan Gilbey - 13 November 16:39

The way Turing’s story is told is comparable to the montage in Big Brother when Davina McCall told evictees: “Let’s have a look at your best bits.” The Imitation Game is Alan Turing’s best bits.

Life Itself.
Life Itself, the new Roger Ebert documentary, shows just how important a critic can be
By Ryan Gilbey - 13 November 13:22

Nineteen months after his death in April 2013, a new documentary tells the story of Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert - his bravery in the face of illness, and his uniquely democratic approach to cinema.

"After Copernicus": a new poem by Olivia Byard
By Olivia Byard - 13 November 10:00

After such a hellish catastrophe,
what happens to the angels?
Do they tumble down thrones
and dominions like bankers
from tall windows?
           Or, wings torn,

Inspiring: Malala Yousafzai speaks at the Forbes Under 30 Summit in Philadelphia on 21 October. Photo: Getty
Hear their voices: a choral celebration of Malala Yousafzai
By Caroline Crampton - 13 November 10:00

Young British composer James McCarthy and Pakistani writer Bina Shah have collaborated to produce Malala, a dramatic work for choir and orchestra that attempts to capture the spirit of her story.

Better with age: Arjen Robben, who used to play for Chelsea, now at Bayern Munich. Photo: Getty
They may be foreign players, but they’re our foreign players
By Hunter Davies - 13 November 10:00

Hunter Davies’s weekly football column, The Fan.

Strange alliance: Ferrante's Neopolitan novels tell of a decades-long friendship between two women. Photo: Chloe Edwards/Millennium Images UK
In her secret life: who exactly is Elena Ferrante?
By Jane Shilling - 13 November 10:00

As Ferrante’s writing became conspicuous, so did her anonymity. Speculation gathered, not just about her identity but even her sex.

Going solo: in the wild, beady-eyed shoebills are natural solitaries
The silent stillness of a shoebill’s stare
By John Burnside - 13 November 10:00

Staring into this powerful bird’s beady eye – its extraordinary face more African mask than that of a bird – I felt connected for a moment to something old and original.

Looking to Europe: after the Second World War, Churchill became an advocate of the need to build European unity
“One man who made history” by another who seems just to make it up: Boris on Churchill
By Richard J Evans - 13 November 10:00

The book reads as if it was dictated, not written. All the way through we hear Boris’s voice; it’s like being cornered in the Drones Club and harangued for hours by Bertie Wooster.

West-side story: Fleetwood Mac
Excess all areas: the pageantry and farce of the Fleetwood Mac story
By Mark Ellen - 13 November 10:00

If you ever thought the laid-back vocals of “Dreams” sounded as if they had been recorded by a naked woman lying between satin sheets, then it’s entirely possible you were right.

Jazz hand: the historian Eric Hobsbawm in 1976. Photo: Getty
Music of time: A night with Eric Hobsbawm’s record collection
By Philip Maughan - 13 November 10:00

I had heard that a new pop-up space, Spiritland in Shoreditch, would be playing records from Hobsbawm’s personal collection, so I went along to listen.

Ooh-aah: Eric Cantona in 2013. Photo: Getty
Maverick or phoney: why Balotelli has nothing in common with Cantona
By Ed Smith - 13 November 10:00

Ed Smith’s weekly column, Left Field. 

Detail from an 1800 engraving of a bust of Euripides. Photo: Getty
Uncovering remarkable lives through my second-hand Classics books
By Josh Spero - 13 November 10:00

Every life has some incident or episode that is worth telling. And so it proved as I delved into my Classics books, writes Josh Spero. 

Ready to rumble: Ali and Foreman in the famous 1974 fight. Photo: Getty
Lords of the ring: reliving Muhammad Ali’s “Rumble in the Jungle”
By Antonia Quirke - 13 November 10:00

A running commentary by Ricky Hatton and fellow boxers to mark the 40th anniversary of the super-fight, in what turned out to be a brilliantly conceived and delivered programme

 

A cross is seen as the moon is illuminated by sunlight during a total lunar eclipse, 8 October 8, 2014. Photo: Getty
Christians in space: Michel Faber’s science-fiction “last book”
By Erica Wagner - 13 November 10:00

We are in a future that is mostly just like the present. This isn’t the world of The Jetsons: Peter and his wife Bea shop in Tesco, have a cat called Joshua, drive a regular old car and read the Daily Express.

Mind your language: experimental psychologist Steven Pinker. Photo: Francesco Guidicini/Camera Press
A “mischievious” grammar: an encounter with the linguist Steven Pinker
By Tom Chivers - 13 November 10:00

There’s simply no reason to think that language (or society) is crumbling at all, says Pinker.

Land of opportunity: the developed world has allowed the poor to get poorer while the super-rich flourish
Capitalism was supposed to signal the end of poverty. What went wrong?
By David Aaronovitch - 13 November 10:00

David Aaronovitch reviews new books about wealth and inequality by Linda Tirado, John Kampfner and Danny Dorling. 

"Do men prefer cricket to waxing?": The Apprentice blog series 10, episode 6
By Anoosh Chakelian - 13 November 8:35

It's sexism and geopolitics for all ages as the teams attempt to invent their own board games.

Ali Smith: "The novel is a revolutionary force". Image: Rex
Ali Smith wins the 2014 Goldsmiths Prize for her novel “How To Be Both”
By Philip Maughan - 12 November 19:00

The £10,000 prize for experimental fiction has been awarded to the Scottish writer for her sixth novel which is “dizzyingly good and so clever that it makes you want to dance”.

A statue of Kim Il-sung in Pyongyang, North Korea. Photo: Feng Li/Getty
I’m in the North Korean embassy in London, looking at a painting of a big brown horse
By Eleanor Margolis - 10 November 9:33

Is the infamously secretive state finally beginning to open up? An art exhibition at the London embassy of the Democratic People’s Republic would seem to suggest it might be.

London's burning: a London fire engine. Photo: Getty
Suzanne Moore: The fish fingers were in flames – then the fire became uncontrollable
By Suzanne Moore - 07 November 12:13

Suzanne Moore’s weekly column, Telling Tales. 

Pink hair: when children become teenagers there are a whole new set of worries. Photo: Ryan and Sarah Deeds/Flickr
Tracey Thorn: I’m still “going through a phase” and it’s not too bad at all
By Tracey Thorn - 07 November 12:09

As your children keep changing, so does the job of bringing them up, each different phase bringing its own specific concerns, which vanish as new ones arise.

In the Frame: Todd
By Tom Humberstone - 07 November 11:19

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Acting out: struggling thespian Stephen Toast (Matt Berry)
Burnt offering: Matt Berry’s Toast is no laughing matter
By Rachel Cooke - 06 November 16:18

It’s as if two sixth formers had watched a few old DVDs – The Dick Emery Show, Rising Damp, the odd episode of Bottom or Alan Partridge – then written down the first thing that came into their heads. 

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