Hilary Mantel wins again

The Costa Book awards herald its first all-female shortlist and graphic work winner.

The judging panel of the Costa Book Awards has named Hilary Mantel among the winners in their individual category awards.

Each of the Awards’ five categories has been won by a woman, a first for the Costa Awards (formerly Whitbread Awards) which begun in 1971.

Mantel, who was profiled by the New Statesman in October, won the Best Novel for Bring up the Bodies. Kathleen Jamie triumphed in the poetry category for her collection The Overhaul; while The Innocents by Francesca Segal won the First Novel Award. Sally Gardener, who is a campaigner for dyslexia and who herself suffers severely from the condition, won in the children’s book category with her novel Maggot Moon.

The 2012 category winners list is also the first to feature a graphic work, with wife and husband Mary and Bryan Talbot winning the biography category for Dotter of her Father’s Eyes. The graphic memoir, which is also illustrated by Bryan Talbot, interweaves the stories of Lucia, daughter of James Joyce, and Mary Talbot’s own personal history.

One of the five category winners will be selected to win the overall Costa Book of The Year prize, which was awarded last year to Andrew Miller for his novel Pure.

Each category winner will receive £5,000, while the Book of the Year prize is worth £30,000. The overall winner will be announced at an awards ceremony in London on 29 January.


Hilary Mantel. Portrait by Leonie Hampton
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SRSLY #14: Interns, Housemaids and Witches

On the pop culture podcast this week, we discuss the Robert De Niro-Anne Hathaway film The Intern, the very last series of Downton Abbey, and Sylvia Townsend Warner’s novel Lolly Willowes.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online.

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The Links

On The Intern

Ryan Gilbey’s discussion of Robert De Niro’s interview tantrums.

Anne Helen Petersen for Buzzfeed on “Anne Hathaway Syndrome”.


On Downton Abbey

This is the sort of stuff you get on the last series of Downton Abbey.


Elizabeth Minkel on the decline of Downton Abbey.



On Lolly Willowes

More details about the novel here.

Sarah Waters on Sylvia Townsend Warner.


Next week:

Caroline is reading Selfish by Kim Kardashian.


Your questions:

We loved reading out your emails this week. If you have thoughts you want to share on anything we've discussed, or questions you want to ask us, please email us on srslypod[at], or @ us on Twitter @srslypod, or get in touch via tumblr here. We also have Facebook now.



The music featured this week, in order of appearance, is:

i - Kendrick Lamar

With or Without You - Scala & Kolacny Brothers 

Our theme music is “Guatemala - Panama March” (by Heftone Banjo Orchestra), licensed under Creative Commons. 

See you next week!

PS If you missed #13, check it out here.

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

Anna Leszkiewicz is the New Statesman's editorial assistant.