2013 Oscar nominations in full

Seth Macfarlane and Emma Stone announce this year’s nominees

The noms are in. Journalists and industry insiders shuffled along to the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in Beverly Hills for the 5:30am announcement, nicely in time for lunch on this side of the pond. The list, usually reserved until 24 January, is being released earlier this year to allow audiences extra time to see the nominated films. So, what are you waiting for?

Best Picture

Amour - Producers TBD

Argo - Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck and George Clooney, Producers

Beasts of the Southern Wild - Dan Janvey, Josh Penn and Michael Gottwald, Producers

Django Unchained - Stacey Sher, Reginald Hudlin and Pilar Savone, Producers

Les Misérables - Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward and Cameron Mackintosh, Producers

Life of Pi - Gil Netter, Ang Lee and David Womark, Producers

Lincoln - Steven Spielberg and Kathleen Kennedy, Producers

Silver Linings Playbook - Donna Gigliotti, Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon, Producers

Zero Dark Thirty - Mark Boal, Kathryn Bigelow and Megan Ellison, Producers

 

Actor in a Leading Role

Bradley Cooper, Silver Linings Playbook

Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln

Hugh Jackman, Les Misérables

Joaquin Phoenix, The Master

Denzel Washington, Flight

 

Actor in a Supporting Role

Alan Arkin, Argo

Robert De Niro, Silver Linings Playbook

Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master

Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln

Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained

 

Actress in a Leading Role

Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty

Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook

Emmanuelle Riva, Amour

Quvenzhané Wallis, Beasts of the Southern Wild

Naomi Watts, The Impossible

 

Actress in a Supporting Role

Amy Adams, The Master

Sally Field, Lincoln

Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables

Helen Hunt, The Sessions

Jacki Weaver, Silver Linings Playbook

 

Animated Feature Film

Brave, Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman

Frankenweenie, Tim Burton

ParaNorman, Sam Fell and Chris Butler

The Pirates! Band of Misfits, Peter Lord

Wreck-It Ralph, Rich Moore

 

Cinematography

Anna Karenina, Seamus McGarvey

Django Unchained, Robert Richardson

Life of Pi, Claudio Miranda

Lincoln, Janusz Kaminski

Skyfall, Roger Deakins

 

Costume Design

Anna Karenina, Jacqueline Durran

Les Misérables, Paco Delgado

Lincoln, Joanna Johnston

Mirror Mirror, Eiko Ishioka

Snow White and the Huntsman, Colleen Atwood

 

Directing

Amour, Michael Haneke

Beasts of the Southern Wild, Benh Zeitlin

Life of Pi, Ang Lee

Lincoln, Steven Spielberg

Silver Linings Playbook, David O. Russell

 

Documentary Feature

5 Broken Cameras, Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi

The Gatekeepers, TBD

How to Survive a Plague, TBD

The Invisible War, TBD

Searching for Sugar Man, TBD

 

Documentary Short Subject

Inocente, Sean Fine and Andrea Nix Fine

Kings Point, Sari Gilman and Jedd Wider

Mondays at Racine, Cynthia Wade and Robin Honan

Open Heart, Kief Davidson and Cori Shepherd Stern

Redemption, Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill

 

Film Editing

Argo, William Goldenberg

Life of Pi, Tim Squyres

Lincoln, Michael Kahn

Silver Linings Playbook, Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers

Zero Dark Thirty, Dylan Tichenor and William Goldenberg

 

Foreign Language Film

Amour, Austria

Kon-Tiki, Norway

No, Chile

A Royal Affair, Denmark

War Witch, Canada

 

Make-up and hairstyling

Hitchcock - Howard Berger, Peter Montagna and Martin Samuel

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey - Peter Swords King, Rick Findlater and Tami Lane

Les Misérables - Lisa Westcott and Julie Dartnell

 

Music (Original Score)

Anna Karenina, Dario Marianelli

Argo, Alexandre Desplat

Life of Pi, Mychael Danna

Lincoln, John Williams

Skyfall, Thomas Newman

 

Music (Original Song)

Before My Time - Chasing Ice, Music and Lyrics by J. Ralph

Everybody Needs A Best Friend –Ted, Music by Walter Murphy, Lyric by Seth MacFarlane

Pi’s Lullaby - Life of Pi, Music by Mychael Danna, Lyric by Bombay Jayashri

Skyfall – Skyfall, Music and Lyric by Adele Adkins and Paul Epworth

Suddenly - Les Misérables, Music by Claude-Michel Schönberg

Lyric by Herbert Kretzmer and Alain Boublil

 

Production Design

Anna Karenina

Production Design: Sarah Greenwood

Set Decoration: Katie Spencer

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

Production Design: Dan Hennah

Set Decoration: Ra Vincent and Simon Bright

Les Misérables

Production Design: Eve Stewart

Set Decoration: Anna Lynch-Robinson

Life of Pi

Production Design: David Gropman

Set Decoration: Anna Pinnock

Lincoln

Production Design: Rick Carter

Set Decoration: Jim Erickson

Short Film (Animated)

Adam and Dog

Minkyu Lee

Fresh Guacamole

PES

Head over Heels

Timothy Reckart and Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly

Maggie Simpson in “The Longest Daycare”

David Silverman

Paperman

John Kahrs

 

Short Film (Live Action)

Asad, Bryan Buckley and Mino Jarjoura

Buzkashi Boys, Sam French and Ariel Nasr

Curfew, Shawn Christensen

Death of a Shadow (Dood van een Schaduw), Tom Van Avermaet and Ellen De Waele

Henry, Yan England

 

Sound Editing

Argo, Erik Aadahl and Ethan Van der Ryn

Django Unchained, Wylie Stateman

Life of Pi, Eugene Gearty and Philip Stockton

Skyfall, Per Hallberg and Karen Baker Landers

Zero Dark Thirty, Paul N.J. Ottosson

 

Sound Mixing

Argo - John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff and Jose Antonio Garcia

Les Misérables - Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson and Simon Hayes

Life of Pi - Ron Bartlett, D.M. Hemphill and Drew Kunin

Lincoln - Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom and Ronald Judkins

Skyfall - Scott Millan, Greg P. Russell and Stuart Wilson

 

Visual Effects

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey - Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton and R. Christopher White

Life of Pi - Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer and Donald R. Elliott

Marvel’s The Avengers - Janek Sirrs, Jeff White, Guy Williams and Dan Sudick

Prometheus - Richard Stammers, Trevor Wood, Charley Henley and Martin Hill

Snow White and the Huntsman - Cedric Nicolas-Troyan, Philip Brennan, Neil Corbould and Michael Dawson

 

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)

Argo, Screenplay by Chris Terrio

Beasts of the Southern Wild, Screenplay by Lucy Alibar & Benh Zeitlin

Life of Pi, Screenplay by David Magee

Lincoln, Screenplay by Tony Kushner

Silver Linings Playbook, Screenplay by David O. Russell

 

Writing (Original Screenplay)

Amour, Written by Michael Haneke

Django Unchained, Written by Quentin Tarantino

Flight, Written by John Gatins

Moonrise Kingdom, Written by Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola

Zero Dark Thirty, Written by Mark Boal

 

The 85th Academy Awards will be presented on 24 February at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Jaoquin Phoenix, nominated for Best Actor.

Philip Maughan is a freelance writer in Berlin and a former Assistant Editor at the New Statesman.

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Bertie Carvel's diary: What would the French think about infidelity to Doctor Foster?

The joy of debuting a new series, Rupert Murdoch's squeamishness and a sting in the tail.

According to the adage, the first thing an actor does when he gets a job is to go on holiday. And so, having finished our sold-out run of James Graham’s Ink at the Almeida and with the show (in which I play a young Rupert Murdoch) about to transfer into the West End, I’m packing my bags.

But before I can skip town, I’ve one more professional engagement: the press launch of series two of the BBC drama Doctor Foster, which we finished filming at Christmas. I’ve now seen the final cut of all five episodes, and I’m excited to share it with an audience. There’s no substitute for seeing other people’s reactions at first hand, especially with a show that got people talking so much first time around, and it’s electric to sit in a cinema full of expectant journalists and commentators and feel the room respond. Nothing beats this: to put so much into making a thing and then experience an audience’s unmediated, reflexive reaction. When it goes well, you feel that you’ve shared something, that you’ve all recognised something together about how things are. It’s a unifying feeling. A sort of bond.

Cheating spouses

Handling the interviews has been tricky, when there’s so little one can say without giving the plot away. (The first series began with Suranne Jones’s character Gemma, a GP, suspecting her husband Simon of having an affair.) What’s more, lots of the questions invite moral judgements that I’ve tried my best to avoid; I always think it’s really important not to judge the characters I play from outside, but simply to work out how they feel about themselves, to zero in on their point of view. There’s a sort of moral bloodlust around this show: it’s extraordinary. People seem to want to hear that I’ve been pilloried in the street, or expect me to put distance between myself and my character, to hang him out to dry as a pariah.

While I’m not in the business of defending Simon Foster any more than I’m in the business of attacking him, I am intrigued by this queer mixture of sensationalism and prurience that seems to surface again and again.

Shock horror

Oddly enough, it’s something that comes up in Ink: many people have been surprised to find that, in a story about the re-launch of the Sun newspaper in 1969 as a buccaneering tabloid, it’s the proprietor who considers dropping anchor when the spirit of free enterprise threatens to set his moral compass spinning.

I’ve never given it much thought before, but I suppose that sensationalism relies on a fairly rigid worldview for its oxygen – the SHOCKERS! that scream at us in tabloid headlines are deviations from a conventional idea of the norm. But what’s behind the appetite for this sort of story? Do we tell tales of transgression to reinforce our collective boundaries or to challenge them?

For me there’s a close kinship between good journalism and good drama. I’m reminded of the words of John Galsworthy, who wrote Strife, the play I directed last summer, and who felt that the writer should aim “to set before the public no cut-and-dried codes, but the phenomena of life and character, selected and combined, but not distorted, by the dramatist’s outlook, set down without fear, favour, or prejudice, leaving the public to draw such poor moral as nature may afford”.

So when it comes to promoting the thing we’ve made, I’m faced with a real conundrum: on the one hand I want it to reach a wide audience, and I’m flattered that there’s an appetite to hear about my contribution to the process of making it; but on the other hand I think the really interesting thing about the work is contained in the work itself. I’m always struck, in art galleries, by how much more time people spend reading the notes next to the paintings than looking at the paintings themselves. I’m sure that’s the wrong way around.

Insouciant remake

En route to the airport the next morning I read that Doctor Foster is to be adapted into a new French version. It’s a cliché verging on racism, but I can’t help wondering whether the French will have a different attitude to a story about marital infidelity, and whether the tone of the press coverage will differ. I wonder, too, whether, in the home of Roland Barthes, there is as much space given to artists to talk about what they’ve made – in his 1967 essay, “The Death of the Author”, Barthes wrote that “a text’s unity lies not in its origin but in its destination”.

No stone unturned

Touring the villages of Gigondas, Sablet and Séguret later that evening, I’m struck by the provision of espaces culturels in seemingly every commune, however small. The French certainly give space to the work itself. But I also notice a sign warning of a chat lunatique, so decide to beat a hasty retreat. Arriving at the house where I’m staying, I’ve been told that the key will be under a flowerpot. Lifting each tub in turn, and finally a large flat stone by the door, I find a small scorpion, but no key. I’m writing this at a table less than a yard away so let’s hope there won’t be a sting in this tale.

Ink opens at the Duke of York Theatre, London, on 9 September. More details: almeida.co.uk

This article first appeared in the 17 August 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Trump goes nuclear