2013 Oscar nominations in full

Seth Macfarlane and Emma Stone announce this year’s nominees

The noms are in. Journalists and industry insiders shuffled along to the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in Beverly Hills for the 5:30am announcement, nicely in time for lunch on this side of the pond. The list, usually reserved until 24 January, is being released earlier this year to allow audiences extra time to see the nominated films. So, what are you waiting for?

Best Picture

Amour - Producers TBD

Argo - Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck and George Clooney, Producers

Beasts of the Southern Wild - Dan Janvey, Josh Penn and Michael Gottwald, Producers

Django Unchained - Stacey Sher, Reginald Hudlin and Pilar Savone, Producers

Les Misérables - Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Debra Hayward and Cameron Mackintosh, Producers

Life of Pi - Gil Netter, Ang Lee and David Womark, Producers

Lincoln - Steven Spielberg and Kathleen Kennedy, Producers

Silver Linings Playbook - Donna Gigliotti, Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon, Producers

Zero Dark Thirty - Mark Boal, Kathryn Bigelow and Megan Ellison, Producers

 

Actor in a Leading Role

Bradley Cooper, Silver Linings Playbook

Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln

Hugh Jackman, Les Misérables

Joaquin Phoenix, The Master

Denzel Washington, Flight

 

Actor in a Supporting Role

Alan Arkin, Argo

Robert De Niro, Silver Linings Playbook

Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master

Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln

Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained

 

Actress in a Leading Role

Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty

Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook

Emmanuelle Riva, Amour

Quvenzhané Wallis, Beasts of the Southern Wild

Naomi Watts, The Impossible

 

Actress in a Supporting Role

Amy Adams, The Master

Sally Field, Lincoln

Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables

Helen Hunt, The Sessions

Jacki Weaver, Silver Linings Playbook

 

Animated Feature Film

Brave, Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman

Frankenweenie, Tim Burton

ParaNorman, Sam Fell and Chris Butler

The Pirates! Band of Misfits, Peter Lord

Wreck-It Ralph, Rich Moore

 

Cinematography

Anna Karenina, Seamus McGarvey

Django Unchained, Robert Richardson

Life of Pi, Claudio Miranda

Lincoln, Janusz Kaminski

Skyfall, Roger Deakins

 

Costume Design

Anna Karenina, Jacqueline Durran

Les Misérables, Paco Delgado

Lincoln, Joanna Johnston

Mirror Mirror, Eiko Ishioka

Snow White and the Huntsman, Colleen Atwood

 

Directing

Amour, Michael Haneke

Beasts of the Southern Wild, Benh Zeitlin

Life of Pi, Ang Lee

Lincoln, Steven Spielberg

Silver Linings Playbook, David O. Russell

 

Documentary Feature

5 Broken Cameras, Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi

The Gatekeepers, TBD

How to Survive a Plague, TBD

The Invisible War, TBD

Searching for Sugar Man, TBD

 

Documentary Short Subject

Inocente, Sean Fine and Andrea Nix Fine

Kings Point, Sari Gilman and Jedd Wider

Mondays at Racine, Cynthia Wade and Robin Honan

Open Heart, Kief Davidson and Cori Shepherd Stern

Redemption, Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill

 

Film Editing

Argo, William Goldenberg

Life of Pi, Tim Squyres

Lincoln, Michael Kahn

Silver Linings Playbook, Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers

Zero Dark Thirty, Dylan Tichenor and William Goldenberg

 

Foreign Language Film

Amour, Austria

Kon-Tiki, Norway

No, Chile

A Royal Affair, Denmark

War Witch, Canada

 

Make-up and hairstyling

Hitchcock - Howard Berger, Peter Montagna and Martin Samuel

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey - Peter Swords King, Rick Findlater and Tami Lane

Les Misérables - Lisa Westcott and Julie Dartnell

 

Music (Original Score)

Anna Karenina, Dario Marianelli

Argo, Alexandre Desplat

Life of Pi, Mychael Danna

Lincoln, John Williams

Skyfall, Thomas Newman

 

Music (Original Song)

Before My Time - Chasing Ice, Music and Lyrics by J. Ralph

Everybody Needs A Best Friend –Ted, Music by Walter Murphy, Lyric by Seth MacFarlane

Pi’s Lullaby - Life of Pi, Music by Mychael Danna, Lyric by Bombay Jayashri

Skyfall – Skyfall, Music and Lyric by Adele Adkins and Paul Epworth

Suddenly - Les Misérables, Music by Claude-Michel Schönberg

Lyric by Herbert Kretzmer and Alain Boublil

 

Production Design

Anna Karenina

Production Design: Sarah Greenwood

Set Decoration: Katie Spencer

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

Production Design: Dan Hennah

Set Decoration: Ra Vincent and Simon Bright

Les Misérables

Production Design: Eve Stewart

Set Decoration: Anna Lynch-Robinson

Life of Pi

Production Design: David Gropman

Set Decoration: Anna Pinnock

Lincoln

Production Design: Rick Carter

Set Decoration: Jim Erickson

Short Film (Animated)

Adam and Dog

Minkyu Lee

Fresh Guacamole

PES

Head over Heels

Timothy Reckart and Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly

Maggie Simpson in “The Longest Daycare”

David Silverman

Paperman

John Kahrs

 

Short Film (Live Action)

Asad, Bryan Buckley and Mino Jarjoura

Buzkashi Boys, Sam French and Ariel Nasr

Curfew, Shawn Christensen

Death of a Shadow (Dood van een Schaduw), Tom Van Avermaet and Ellen De Waele

Henry, Yan England

 

Sound Editing

Argo, Erik Aadahl and Ethan Van der Ryn

Django Unchained, Wylie Stateman

Life of Pi, Eugene Gearty and Philip Stockton

Skyfall, Per Hallberg and Karen Baker Landers

Zero Dark Thirty, Paul N.J. Ottosson

 

Sound Mixing

Argo - John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff and Jose Antonio Garcia

Les Misérables - Andy Nelson, Mark Paterson and Simon Hayes

Life of Pi - Ron Bartlett, D.M. Hemphill and Drew Kunin

Lincoln - Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom and Ronald Judkins

Skyfall - Scott Millan, Greg P. Russell and Stuart Wilson

 

Visual Effects

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey - Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton and R. Christopher White

Life of Pi - Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer and Donald R. Elliott

Marvel’s The Avengers - Janek Sirrs, Jeff White, Guy Williams and Dan Sudick

Prometheus - Richard Stammers, Trevor Wood, Charley Henley and Martin Hill

Snow White and the Huntsman - Cedric Nicolas-Troyan, Philip Brennan, Neil Corbould and Michael Dawson

 

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)

Argo, Screenplay by Chris Terrio

Beasts of the Southern Wild, Screenplay by Lucy Alibar & Benh Zeitlin

Life of Pi, Screenplay by David Magee

Lincoln, Screenplay by Tony Kushner

Silver Linings Playbook, Screenplay by David O. Russell

 

Writing (Original Screenplay)

Amour, Written by Michael Haneke

Django Unchained, Written by Quentin Tarantino

Flight, Written by John Gatins

Moonrise Kingdom, Written by Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola

Zero Dark Thirty, Written by Mark Boal

 

The 85th Academy Awards will be presented on 24 February at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Jaoquin Phoenix, nominated for Best Actor.

Philip Maughan is a freelance writer in Berlin and a former Assistant Editor at the New Statesman.

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Okja begins as a buddy flick – but ends up in the slaughterhouse

Korean director Bong Joon-ho works with British co-writer Jon Ronson on this tale of genetically engineered superpigs.

If Studio Ghibli, the Japanese animation studio responsible for Spirited Away, were to branch out into live action, the result might be something like Okja – at least in part. It’s the tale of a genetically engineered breed of waddling grey superpigs, not so much porcine in appearance as manatee or hippo-like, created by the twitchy, imperious CEO of a multinational corporation, Lucy Mirando (Tilda Swinton), in the hope of solving a global food shortage.

Each of these docile beasts is despatched to a different corner of the planet to be reared. The enormous Okja grows up in rural Korea, gambolling in the fields with her young companion, Mija (Ahn Seo-hyun).

Okja is no dumb animal – she saves the child from falling off a cliff by using a rope to improvise a sophisticated pulley system. She should be working in crisis management, not ending up on someone’s fork. But eventually the day comes when Mirando’s representatives arrive to claim their several thousand pounds of flesh.

The early scenes borrow the leisurely rhythms of Mija’s idyllic days with Okja; she snoozes on the beast’s vast belly, softly rising and falling in time with her pet’s breathing. Yet once she follows the kidnapped creature to Seoul, where they are taken in by a band of animal rights activists, the film lurches from one style to another. What begins as a tranquil buddy movie finishes up in the blood-soaked slaughterhouse where Okja is due to end her days; it’s as though My Neighbour Totoro had morphed into Fast Food Nation.

The film’s Korean director, Bong Joon-ho, and his British co-writer, Jon Ronson, present viewers with a transaction that reflects the ethical and ecological implications of the story.

We can have our heart-warming tale of the bond between human and animal, but only if we accept also those parts of the plot which demystify that relationship and take it to its industrialised extreme. It’s a bold strategy that has worked before for this film-maker – in The Host and Snowpiercer he used the genres of horror and action, respectively, to smuggle through political and environmental messages.

But Okja risks falling between two stools. Young children who might enjoy the first third (and can see Okja on Netflix the very day it is released in cinemas, easily bypassing the 15 certificate) would be alternately bored and traumatised by the rest of it. Conversely, adults will have an awful lot of whimsy to wade through before reaching the meat of the movie.

There are compensations. The film is sumptuously designed by Lee Ha-jun and Kevin Thompson, and crisply shot by Darius Khondji. Swinton, who played the villain in Snowpiercer as a grotesque northern schoolmarm with oversized gnashers, puts in the distorting dentures once again in Okja as both Lucy and her sister, Nancy, with whom she is locked in an irresolvable rivalry. Lucy is bleached (pink skin, platinum hair, white robes) to the point of invisibility, whereas Nancy is a harrumphing Penelope Keith type in a quilted jacket.

Other capable actors are undone by the unreasonable demands placed on them. Shirley Henderson, as Lucy’s assistant, has been directed to talk at comically high speed for want of any actual funny dialogue, and Paul Dano would be more plausible as a winsome animal rights activist if he weren’t leading the Animal Liberation Front. The group’s portrayal here as a group of touchy-feely flower children (“This is a non-lethal chokehold, OK?” one member says, as he disables a security guard) is laughable.

But no one comes out of Okja quite as badly as Jake Gyllenhaal in the role of Dr Johnny Wilcox, a wacky nature TV presenter who is like Steve Irwin trapped in Timmy Mallett’s body. The film is at its most wrong-headed in scenes where Dr Johnny, left alone with Okja, first forces her to mate with another superpig (a pointless episode that serves no plot function) and then tortures her.

It’s that risky trade-off again: enjoy the knockabout chase sequence in which Okja fires turds at her adversaries, and later you must endure the darker side of the same narrative. It will be a forgiving audience indeed that doesn’t recoil from this approach, which is too much stick and not enough carrot.

Ryan Gilbey is the New Statesman's film critic. He is also the author of It Don't Worry Me (Faber), about 1970s US cinema, and a study of Groundhog Day in the "Modern Classics" series (BFI Publishing). He was named reviewer of the year in the 2007 Press Gazette awards.

This article first appeared in the 22 June 2017 issue of the New Statesman, The zombie PM

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