Friday Arts Diary

Our cultural picks for the week ahead.

Art

From Death to Death and Other Small Tales, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh 15 Dec-8 Sept 2013

Presenting masterpieces from the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art and the D Daskalopoulos Collection, one of the most private important collections of modern and contemporary art, this exhibition offers the visitor 130 works.

The focus of the exhibition is the importance of the body as a theme in 20th and 21st century art practice. Visitors will be able to see works that have not previously been available to view in Scotland. The D.Daskalopoulos Collection has developed since 1994 and artists include Marcel Duchamp, Tracey Emin and Marina Abramovic.

Comedy

Josie Long, Romance and Adventure, BAC, London SW11, 19-21 December

The comedian is on tour with her sixth comedy solo show, Romance and Adventure, which was also nominated for the Edinburgh comedy award for best show (the third year in a row she's received that nomination). The show promises high-end adventure pursuits and even a moment when Josie will pretend to be some kind of posh Godzilla on the rampage. Focusing on the issues facing those turning 30, including the struggle to keep going when you are tired and the myriad doubts one faces.

Theatre

Privates on Parade, Noel Coward Theatre, London WC2, until 2 March 2013

Having opened in the West End a few days ago, this production has already received rave reviews in the national newspapers for the star performance from Simon Russell Beale. The play, directed here by Michael Grandage, is a comedy set against the murderous backdrop of the Malaysian campaign at the end of the Second World War. Private Steven Flowers is sent to the Song and Dance Unit in South East Asia where he meets Captain Terri Dennis, played by Russell Beale. Private Flowers soon learns from the flamboyant captain that becoming a man is more than just the uniform.

Julius Caesar, Donmar Warehouse, London WC2, until 9 February

This all-female production of one of history’s most prominent figures in Shakespeare’s play has likewise been successful among critics. It is Phyllida Lloyd’s first appearance as director since the Thatcher biopic The Iron Lady, and it is a return that is certainly lauded. Although Mark Rylance and Stephen Fry’s casting in Twelfth Night in an all-male production appears to have gained more headlines, the Donmar’s show is set to be a hit with the focus on the all-important issues of power and corruption.

Music

London Symphony Orchestra/Valery Gergiev, Barbican Centre, London EC2, 19 December

As part of UBS Soundscapes, the London Symphony of Orchestra will be performing next weekin the Barbican Hall. They will perform Szymanowski’s Symphony No 4 ("Symphonie Concertante"), his Violin Concerto No 2 and Brahms's Symphony No 4, conducted by Russian conductor, Valery Gergiev. Gergiev will be conducting several performances between 19 December and 31 March 2013.

Tracey Emin, whose work will feature in the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art's latest exhibition on 15 December onwards. Photograph: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
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Yes, you could skip brunch and save for a deposit on a house. But why?

You'd be missing out. 

There’s a tiny café round the corner from me, a place so small that you have to leave your Bugaboo pushchair outside (a serious consideration in this part of the world), which has somehow become famous across town for its brunch. At weekends, the queue spills on to the road, with people patiently waiting for up to an hour for pancakes, poached eggs and pondy-looking juices served in jam jars. The food is just as good later on, yet there’s rarely much of a line after 2pm, because brunch is cool in a way that lunch isn’t. Where lunch is quotidian, brunch feels decadent – a real weekend treat.

Though the phenomenon is hardly new – the term was coined by a Brit back in 1895 – brunch has always been more popular in the United States than here, possibly because it’s a meal that you generally go out for and eating out has long been more affordable, and thus common, across the pond. Despite our proud greasy-spoon heritage, the idea of brunch as an occasion with a distinct character, rather than just a wickedly late breakfast, is relatively recent, and it owes much to the increasing informality of 21st-century life.

The Little Book of Brunch by Caroline Craig and Sophie Missing revels in the freedom that the occasion bestows upon the cook, falling as it does outside the long-established conventions of the three-meal
structure. “It’s the meal where you can get away with anything,” they write.

By way of proof, along with eggs Benedict and buttermilk waffles, the book features such novelties as ’nduja-and-egg pizza, spaghetti frittatas and lentil falafels – dishes that you could quite respectably serve for lunch or dinner, yet also contain the cosseting, comforting qualities necessary in a first meal of the day.

Though such culinary experimentation is no doubt attractive to the increasingly adventurous British palate, I suspect that the arrival on these shores of the “bottomless brunch”, a hugely popular trend in the US, may also have something to do with our new enthusiasm for the meal – to the concern of health experts, given that Americans seem better able to grasp the idea of drinking as many Bloody Marys as they can handle, rather than as many as they want.

As David Shaftel put it in an op-ed for the New York Times entitled, wonderfully, “Brunch is for jerks”, this meal is “about throwing out not only the established schedule but also the social conventions of our parents’ generation . . . revelling in the naughtiness of waking up late, having cocktails at breakfast and eggs all day. It’s the mealtime equivalent of a Jeff Koons sculpture.”

The Australian social commentator Bernard Salt agrees, blaming this taste for “smashed avocado with crumbled feta on five-grain toasted bread at $22 a pop” for the younger generation’s failure to grow up, take responsibility and save enough money to buy a house. But as critics observed, house prices in Sydney, like those in the UK, are now so high that you’d have to forgo your weekly avo toast for 175 years in order to put together a deposit, and so, perhaps, it’s not unreasonable to want to live in the moment instead. “We are not going out for brunch instead of buying houses: we are brunching because we cannot afford to buy houses,” as the journalist Brigid Delaney wrote in response.

Baby boomers got the free education, the generous pensions and the houses and left us with shakshuka, sourdough and a flat white. Seems like a fair deal. 

Felicity Cloake is the New Statesman’s food columnist. Her latest book is The A-Z of Eating: a Flavour Map for Adventurous Cooks.

This article first appeared in the 20 April 2017 issue of the New Statesman, May's gamble

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