Investment Art: A Beginner's Guide

Forget your shares portfolio - the recession-dodging art market is increasingly proving to be the most profitable place for high-stakes investment

Oscar Wilde may have been mistaken when he claimed “all art is quite useless”. A new use for art has been emerging in recent years, and it may be the most pragmatic of all – as a solid investment. In a time when stock markets are sinking, debts are rising and the looming threat of double-dip recession cannot be entirely eliminated, the art market still sporadically dazzles with record-breaking profits. The unique economic buoyancy of art has long caught the eye of not just aesthetes, but also discerning investors.

Art now falls under the category of the "SWAG" asset. The term, coined by analyst Joe Roseman of Investment Week denotes "alternate investments" which manage to defy economic gravity – namely silver, wine, art and gold.

As well as being decidedly sexier than the FTSE 100, the trend of investing in luxury assets makes a lot of economic common sense. SWAGs often outperform other equities in times of economic downturn for several logical reasons. Firstly, they benefit from the uniquely profitable principle of "scarcity economics" (their value is related to their rarity). Secondly, in an unsteady market, people are drawn to stability, and all the SWAG assets are durable – they have a historical precedence of desirability and can be bought and stored almost indefinitely. Lastly, as their returns are not related to the patterns of the stock market, they add a sensible diversity to any portfolio, the literal asset equivalent of not keeping all your eggs in one basket.

So, we’ve all been there - you’ve got a few spare million in the savings account and you can’t decide whether to invest in the Damien Hirst or the Château Lafite. Luckily, help is at hand. The art market’s unique ability to maintain a bubble of prosperity amidst a global recession has given rise to a new type of business – the art investment advisor.

Businesses of this sort were virtually unheard of a decade ago, and yet the demand  for art purely as an investment has seen a proliferation in recent years. As well as increasing numbers of private banks offering advisory services to their clients, specialist companies such as Fine Art Wealth Management and The Art Investor exist to assist buyers on making choices for bespoke portfolios which can maximise returns. Perhaps most significant in this field, however, is The Fine Art Fund. Set up just over a decade ago by Philip Hoffman, this was the first business of its type to invest in art as an asset. Currently, they manage more than $150m of assets and achieved a net annual return of 6.34 per cent over the past eight years.

Hoffman recently told the Sunday Times, “In the old days people invested in bonds, stocks and cash, and now they’re investing in ten different subject headings and art is just one of them ... People don’t look at their gold bars and, in some cases, they treat art in the same way.”

The rise of these businesses is necessary because the unregulated nature of the art market means that it still straddles an awkward line between solid economic sense and a frantic, wild gamble. On one hand, there are plenty of promising statistics: in 2011, the Financial Times reported that the art market made an 11 per cent return to its investors, a frantic outstripping of stock market return. This year, sales have been promising, with impressive prices achieved at Art Basel in June, and there is a wealth of evidence that the top end of the market has been immune to the turbulence underneath it. In fact, over half of the 20 most expensive auction sales of all time have been completed since 2008, indicating an economic buoyancy which overcomes even the recession.

So far, so lucrative. Yet, the mechanics of the art economy are governed by strange, volatile forces which means that it is never a safe bet. Charles Saatchi himself noted “Art is no investment unless you get very, very lucky” in his 2009 book My Name is Charles Saatchi and I am an Artaholic. In many ways the art market is an economist’s worst nightmare. It is wholly speculative and subjective, and therefore constitutionally unpredictable. The valuation of contemporary art, in particular, is based on a collection of changeable and changing opinions. It is constantly affected by external circumstances, and trends are capable of crashing out of fashion just as swiftly as they crashed it. Additionally, it is fundamentally impossible to confirm the value of the market as a whole. Private sales comprise approximately 75 per cent of the total market, and these are almost always undisclosed. “The art market is the most illiquid, opaque market in the world,” explained Jeff Rabin, quoted in The Art Newspaper. Given this, manoeuvring within it is always going to be a guessing game.

Other industries have, too, sprung up in reaction to the demand of fine-art investment, notably the specialist storage port. Investment art is, emphatically, not bought to be hung on the wall. Instead, collectors are increasingly storing their assets in state-of-the-art warehouses. Christies are currently expanding their "Fine Art Storage Service" due to increased demand, and new ports are due to open in Singapore and Luxenbourg, adding to existing onces in Geneva. These large-scale warehouses offer highly regulated storage controls with humidity and light protection as well as extensive on-site security. They also have a notably appeal to the money-minded collector in that they allow the temporary postponement of VAT and customs duty payments.

The implications of this are vast. Not only with regards to the valuation of art, but with an entire overhaul of its purpose. Art bought as an asset and stored, indefinitely in a warehouse, far from the damaging light of day denotes a new mode of art ownership – one where the object d’art is reduced to a purely monetary transaction.

“It’s a depressing thought,” comments Connie Viney, a London-based artist who regularly exhibits at The Vyner Street Gallery, “Just recently there was the news that Sotheby’s have once again broken their auction record by selling a Rothko for £47.3m. By all accounts, it seems that that price will just increase once again next time it’s sold. With sums like that, how can people think of art becoming anything but a get-rich-quick scheme?”

Is this the real status of art in today's world? Elite, out-priced, stored out of site and endlessly circulated in a micro-economy closed off to all but the super-wealthy? "Art for art’s sake" is a 19th century concept. "Art for the people", too, is becoming swiftly outdated. The motto for our times, it seems, is "Art for the 1 per cent".

Auctioneers place bids during the Damien Hirst's Beautiful Inside My Head Forever, at Sotheby's in 2008. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

Kamila Kocialkowska is a freelance journalist based in London.



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If the SNP truly want another referendum, the clock is ticking

At party conference in Glasgow, I heard Scotland’s governing party demand a future distinctly different from the one being sketched out in Westminster. 

Nicola Sturgeon described Glasgow as the “dear green city” in her opening address to the SNP party conference, which may surprise anyone raised on a diet of Ken Loach films. In fact, if you’re a fan of faded grandeur and nostalgic parks, there are few places to beat it. My morning walk to conference took me past chipped sandstone tenements, over a bridge across the mysterious, twisting River Kelvin, and through a long avenue of autumnal trees in Kelvingrove Park. In the evenings, the skyline bristled with Victorian Gothic university buildings and church spires, and the hipster bars turned on their lights.

In between these two walks, I heard Scotland’s governing party demand a future distinctly different from the one being sketched out in Westminster. Glasgow’s claim to being the UK’s second city expired long ago but I wonder if, post-Brexit, there might be a case for reviving it.



Scottish politics may never have looked more interesting, but at least one Glasgow taxi driver is already over it. All he hears in the back of his cab is “politics, fitba and religion”, he complained when he picked me up from the station. The message didn’t seem to have reached SNP delegates at the conference centre on the Clyde, who cheered any mention of another referendum.

The First Minister, though, seems to have sensed the nation’s weariness. Support for independence has fallen from 47 per cent in June (Survation) to 39 per cent in October (BMG Research). Sturgeon made headlines with the announcement of a draft referendum bill, but read her speeches carefully and nothing is off the table. SNP politicians made the same demands again and again – devolved control of immigration and access to the single market. None ruled out these happening while remaining in the UK.

If Sturgeon does want a soft Brexit deal, though, she must secure it fast. Most experts agree that it would be far easier for an independent Scotland to inherit Britain’s EU membership than for it to reapply. Once Article 50 is triggered, the SNP will be in a race against the clock.


The hare and the tortoise

If anyone is still in doubt about the SNP’s position, look who won the deputy leadership race. Angus Robertson, the gradualist leader of the party in the Commons, saw off a referendum-minded challenger, Tommy Sheppard, with 52.5 per cent of the vote.

Conference would be nothing without an independence rally, and on the final day supporters gathered for one outside. A stall sold “Indyref 2” T-shirts but the grass-roots members I spoke to were patient, at least for now. William Prowse, resplendent in a kilt and a waistcoat covered in pro-indy
badges, remains supportive of Sturgeon. “The reason she has not called an Indy 2 vote
is we need to have the right numbers,” he told me. “She’s playing the right game.”

Jordi McArthur, a member for 30 years, stood nearby waving a flagpole with the Scottish, Welsh and Catalan flags side by side. “We’re happy to wait until we know what is happening with Brexit,” he said. “But at the same time, we want a referendum. It won’t be Nicola’s choice. It will be the grass roots’ choice.”


No Gerrymandering

Party leaders may come and go, but SNP members can rely on one thing at conference – the stage invasions of the pensioner Gerry Fisher. A legendary dissenter, Fisher refused this year to play along with the party’s embrace of the EU. Clutching the
lectern stubbornly, he told members: “Don’t tell me that you can be independent and a member of the EU. It’s factually rubbish.” In the press room, where conference proceedings were shown unrelentingly on a big screen, hacks stopped what they were doing to cheer him on.


Back to black

No SNP conference would be complete without a glimpse of Mhairi Black, the straight-talking slayer of Douglas Alexander and Westminster’s Baby of the House. She is a celebrity among my millennial friends – a video of her maiden Commons speech has been watched more than 700,000 times – and her relative silence in recent months is making them anxious.

I was determined to track her down, so I set my alarm for an unearthly hour and joined a queue of middle-aged women at an early-morning fringe event. The SNP has taken up the cause of the Waspi (Women Against State Pension Inequality) campaign, run by a group of women born in the 1950s whose retirement age has been delayed and are demanding compensation. Black, who is 22, has become their most ­articulate spokeswoman.

The event started but her chair remained unfilled. When she did arrive, halfway through the session, it was straight from the airport. She gave a rip-roaring speech that momentarily convinced even Waspi sceptics like me, and then dashed off to her next appointment.


Family stories

Woven through the SNP conference was an argument about the benefits of immigration (currently controlled by Westminster). This culminated in an appearance by the Brain family, whose attempt to resist deportation back to Australia has made them a national cause célèbre. (Their young son has learned to speak Gaelic.) Yet for me, the most emotional moment of the conference was when another family, the Chhokars, stepped on stage. Surjit Singh Chhokar was murdered in 1998, but it took 17 years of campaigning and a change in double jeopardy laws before his killer could be brought to justice.

As Aamer Anwar, the family’s solicitor, told the story of “Scotland’s Stephen Lawrence”, Chhokar’s mother and sister stood listening silently, still stricken with grief. After he finished, the delegates gave the family a standing ovation.

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, the New Statesman’s politics blog

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

This article first appeared in the 20 October 2016 issue of the New Statesman, Brothers in blood