NS columnist is the bookies' favourite for the Man Booker Prize.

According to the latest bookmakers' odds, the New Statesman columnist Will Self is the favourite to win this year's Man Booker Prize with his novel Umbrella. The book was reviewed in the NS earlier this year by Brian Dillon. Umbrella, Dillon wrote, "is a complexly textured, conceptually forbidding thesis about the modern, its art and their discontents", with echoes of great modernists such as Joyce and Eliot, and also of Flaubert. "This being Self," Dillon went on, "there is also a great deal of humour".

Second favourite with the bookies is Hilary Mantel's historical novel about Thomas Cromwell Bring Up The Bodies, the sequel to the Booker-winning Wolf Hall, and the second novel in a projected trilogy. Bring Up the Bodies was reviewed for the NS by novelist Amanda Craig, not a fan of Wolf Hall. "What makes Bring Up the Bodies so different from its predecessor?" Craig asked. "I think it’s the emotional intelligence with which Henry, Boleyn, Crom­well and the rest are depicted as characters we can feel for, as opposed to just know about." Craig ended her review with a prediction: "Bring Up the Bodies should net its author another Booker Prize – deservedly, this time."

Mantel was profiled in a recent issue of the New Statesman by Sophie Elmhirst. Elmhirst tells a story about the night in October 2009 when Mantel won the Man Booker Prize.

“I worry about people who can’t make their voices heard . . . People like me from working-class backgrounds could sort of weasel through and I’m not sure that applies any more.” On the night of 6 October 2009, when Mantel won the Booker Prize for Wolf Hall, she sat at the Fourth Estate table with [her editor Nicholas] Pearson and, minutes before the announcement of the winner was due, she told him about a young writer she thought he should read. They were both anxious, hyper-aware that this was the career-transforming moment, that she was on the cusp of industry recognition long overdue, but she thought she would use the time and the opportunity to recommend a new author to her publisher.

The other novels on this year's Man Booker Prize shortlist are:

The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng

Swimming Home by Deborah Levy

The Lighthouse by Alison Moore

Narcopolis by Jeet Thayil (reviewed for the NS by Anita Sethi)

The winner of the prize will be announced at a ceremony tonight at the Guildhall in London. The judges are Sir Peter Stothad (chair), Amanda Foreman, Dan Stevens, Bharat Tandon and Dinah Birch.

Frontrunner: Will Self, favourite for this year's Man Booker Prize (Photo: Man Booker Prize)
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SRSLY #20: Friends, Lovers, Divers

On the pop culture podcast this week, we talk albums from Joanna Newsom, Bjork and Grimes, Todd Haynes film Carol, and comedy web series Ex-Best.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online.

Listen to our new episode now:

...or subscribe in iTunes. We’re also on Stitcher, RSS and SoundCloud – but if you use a podcast app that we’re not appearing in, let us know.

SRSLY is hosted by Caroline Crampton and Anna Leszkiewicz, the NS’s web editor and editorial assistant. We’re on Twitter as @c_crampton and @annaleszkie, where between us we post a heady mixture of Serious Journalism, excellent gifs and regularly ask questions J K Rowling needs to answer.

If you’d like to talk to us about the podcast or make a suggestion for something we should read or cover, you can email srslypod[at]

You can also find us on Twitter @srslypod, or send us your thoughts on tumblr here. If you like the podcast, we'd love you to leave a review on iTunes - this helps other people come across it.

The Links

Joanna Newsom, Bjork and Grimes

Joanna Newsom’s Divers doesn't seem to be on Spotify, but you can get it on iTunes here. Listen to Grimes’ Art Angels here and Bjork's Vulnicura here.

This is a good piece about Joanna Newsom.

This piece makes the comparison with Elena Ferrante that we talk about on the podcast.

Here's Grimes's own post about Bjork.

Tavi Gevinson's interview with Joanna Newsom (where she talks about liking Grimes).



Ryan Gilbey's review of Carol, which he calls “as tantalising as hearing a tender ballad on a tinpot transistor”.

Anna's piece about the photographers that influenced the visual style of the film.

An interesting Q & A with director Todd Haynes.



The full series is available to watch for free here.

Meghan Murphy on friendship break-ups.


Your questions:

We love reading out your emails. If you have thoughts you want to share on anything we've discussed, or questions you want to ask us, please email us on srslypod[at], or @ us on Twitter @srslypod, or get in touch via tumblr here. We also have Facebook now.


Our theme music is “Guatemala - Panama March” (by Heftone Banjo Orchestra), licensed under Creative Commons. 


See you next week!

PS If you missed #19, check it out here.

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.