A publishing powerhouse

Could a merger between Penguin and Random House stop Amazon in its tracks?

After the FT reported that talks had been held between two of the world’s “big six” publishers, Penguin and Random House, an official statement has finally been made. Pearson, the UK-listed education specialist (and the world’s single largest book publisher), who owns both Penguin and the FT, released the following announcement: “Pearson confirms that it is discussing with Bertelsmann a possible combination of Penguin and Random House. The two companies have no reached an agreement and there is no certainty that the discussion will lead to a transaction. A further announcement will be made if and when appropriate.”

Random House is owned by the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann, whose ill-fated merger with Sony (creating Sony-BMG) has left them anxious to take the lead on any potential deal. Thomas Rabe, Bertelsmann’s chief executive, commented on the “pitfalls of putting creative businesses together”, which mean that one side must take ultimate control. “We have the ambition to lead,” he said.

A merger between the two companies – whose brands, it should be noted, are distinct and unlikely to be hastily dissolved – would create a 25 per cent market share, large enough to come under scrutiny from the OFT and Competition Commission. A second factor which may hinder a potential merger is the ongoing allegations of price-fixing in the US, a suit which Penguin has repeatedly contested.

The elephant in the room, as ever, is Amazon. The internet retailer, whose UK business operates from the company’s base in Luxembourg, continues to plough millions into its ebook infrastructure despite huge losses. Described by Waterstones head James Daunt as a “ruthless, money-making devil” and of “using authors as a financial football” by Curtis Brown chairman Jonathan Lloyd, the company facilitates and encourages self-publishing, which perhaps signals the endgame of their repeated attempts to undermine present publishing models. “Penguin House” may just have the reputation, power and resources to stop the internet giant in its tracks.

Phil Jones, editor of the publishing trade magazine The Bookseller, said: “The merger of Penguin and Random house would create a powerhouse of a consumer publisher across books, ebooks and apps.” Analyst Lorna Tilbian from Numis Securities concurs: “Consolidation is the order of the day,” she said. “Technology and tablet computers have given it extra momentum. They [publishers] have got to gang together to have enough clout to take on the technology giants that have transformed the industry.”

Update: This morning the merger between Penguin and Random House was confirmed. Check out The Bookseller for more information.

Berthold Lubetkin's Penguin Pool at London Zoo (Photograph: Getty Images)

Philip Maughan is Assistant Editor at the New Statesman.

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In Kid Gloves, Knausgaardian style provides a route through a writer's grief

Adam Mars-Jones has created a clever, stoical and cool account of caring for a dying father.

In bookish circles, it’s pretty commonplace these days to remark on the way in which the spirit of the Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgaard hangs over our literary culture – noxious gas or enlivening blast of ­oxygen, depending on your point of view. Nor would I be the first critic to point out the similarities between his prolixity and that of the British novelist Adam Mars-Jones. Reviewing Knausgaard’s My Struggle in the New Yorker, James Wood likened its style – “hundreds of pages of autopsied minutiae” – to that of Mars-Jones’s novels Pilcrow and Cedilla, the first two volumes in a thus far unfinished project in “micro-realism”. But originality be damned: I’m going to say it anyway. As I read Mars-Jones’s new memoir, Kid Gloves: a Voyage Round My Father, it was Knausgaard I thought of repeatedly. Mostly, this was because I simply couldn’t believe I was so fascinated by a book that was at times so very boring.

Mars-Jones is by far the more elegant writer of the two. He is also feline where Knausgaard is only wide-eyed. Nevertheless, they clamber (slowly and with many pauses to consider the view) over comparable territory. What, after all, is Knausgaard’s account of the effect of milk on a bowl of ­cereal compared to Mars-Jones’s disquisition on the subject of orange juice? The Norwegian’s reverie is the longer of the two but it is Mars-Jones who is the more triumphantly banal. “Shopping on a Monday I saw a wide variety of types of orange juice on display in a supermarket and bought large quantities,” he writes early on. I love that “Monday” – it’s so precise. But it also prompts the question: which supermarket, exactly, was he in? Was it the same “large branch of Sainsbury’s” where, three paragraphs later, we find him picking up a carton of buttermilk?

You will think that I am taking the piss. I’m not – or not entirely. For all its pedantic weirdness, Mars-Jones’s memoir, clotted and rich and true, does its job rather well. As the subtitle suggests, at its heart is his tricky relationship with Sir William Mars-Jones, the high court judge who died in 1999. A clever man but also a difficult one (having made a bit of a leap in terms of education and social class, he clung rather ardently to certain comforting reflexes), he is brought to life vividly by his son, who often simply replays their most frustrating conversations. In doing so, Mars-Jones, Jr also tells us something of himself. He comes over as a bit silly and fastidious but also as clever, stoical, kindly and, above all, ever cool in the face of provocation. In this light, his Pooterish digressions are just another symptom of his unnervingly temperate personality, his clinical even-handedness.

His memoir is oddly artless, the stories tumbling out, one after another, like washing pulled from a machine. An account of his father’s better-known cases (he prosecuted in the Moors murders trial) shades into a detour on soup-making; an analysis of Sir William’s retirement – he gravitated, his son writes, towards the state of “inanition” – takes us, almost slyly, to an explanation of why Mars-Jones tenderly associates Badedas with shingles (a friend who had yet to discover he had Aids, of which shingles can be a symptom, bathed in it).

The reader waits, and waits, for the big scene, for the moment when Mars-Jones tells his father, a regular kind of homophobe, that he is gay. But in a strange way (it does arrive eventually) this is beside the point. From the outset, we know that it was Adam, not his brothers, who looked after his widowed father in his last days, sharing his flat in Gray’s Inn Square; so we know already that an accommodation has been reached, however horrifying Pater’s reaction was at the time. (Mars-Jones, Sr suggested that his son could not possibly be gay because, as a boy, he played with himself during a film starring Jacqueline Bisset; more cruelly, he delegated his clerk to research the possibilities of testosterone treatment for his son.) In any case, there is a universality here: for which of us, gay or not, hasn’t trembled on hearing our mother say, down the line from home, the dread phrase “Dad would like a word”?

After his father’s death, Mars-Jones attempts to continue to live in his parents’ home, insisting that the inn will have to evict him if it wants him gone. When it does turf him out, he writes a piece for the Times in which he denounces its members – in ­effect, his parents’ friends and neighbours. Is this just the response of a more than usually broke freelance writer? Or is it that of a man in deep grief?

Perhaps it’s both. Mars-Jones tells us quite a bit about his parlous finances but relatively little of his feelings of abandonment. He was closer to his mother. It is more than 15 years since his father died. And yet, here it is, his book. Those Knausgaardian impulses of his – perhaps they’re just displacement for his loss, word-fill for a void so unfathomably big that it still takes him by surprise, even now. 

Kid Gloves: a Voyage Round My Father is available now from Particular Books (£16.99)

Rachel Cooke trained as a reporter on The Sunday Times. She is now a writer at The Observer. In the 2006 British Press Awards, she was named Interviewer of the Year.

This article first appeared in the 27 August 2015 issue of the New Statesman, Isis and the new barbarism