Five questions answered on Bombardier’s contract to provide trains for Crossrail

How much is the Bombardier-Crossrail contract worth?

Train and aerospace manufacturer Bombardier has won the contract to manufacture trains for London’s Crossrail project. We answer five questions on the key comission.

How much is the Bombardier-Crossrail contract worth?

The contract is worth a hefty £1bn and requires Bombardier to provide 65 trains for the Crossrail service, set to open in 2018.

Will any new jobs be created by the contract?

Yes. The Department for Transport (DfT) said Bombardier's contract would support 760 manufacturing jobs and 80 apprenticeships at its Derby-based factory. It added that 74 per cent of the amount spent on the contract would stay in the UK economy. A spokesperson for Canada-headquartered Bombardier told the BBC that 340 new jobs would be created in total.

What have business secretary Vince Cable and London mayor Boris Johnson said about the contract?

Cable said the contract would be a good boost to the Midlands. He added: "The government has been working hard with industry to support the UK rail supply chain to maximise growth opportunities through contracts like this."

Johnson said: "With a firm on board to deliver a fleet of 21st century trains and the tunnelling more than halfway complete, we're on track to deliver a truly world-class railway for the capital."

What features will the train carriages have?

The newly built carriages will be 200 metres long and be able to take up to 1,500 passengers. They will also be air-conditioned, with linked, walk-through carriages, and provide live travel information.

What other benefits will come from Crossrail?

As well as the extra jobs at Bombardier, it is estimated that Crossrail, which will travel from Maidenhead and Heathrow Airport to the west of London, to Abbey Wood and Shenfield in the east, would support 55,000 full-time jobs around the country. The government has also said Crossrail will provide about 10 per cent more capacity to the London train network.

Crossrail workers in the disused Connaught tunnel, near Abbey Wood. Photograph: Getty Images.

Heidi Vella is a features writer for

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.