Political announcements signal a greater role for the market in China

President Xi Jinping's comments at the conclusion of the third plenum of the party’s 18th Central Committee signalled greater interest in protecting the private sector - but many risks still remain.

A "deepening" role for the market was proclaimed by China’s ruling elite as it concluded the third plenum of the party’s 18th Central Committee. While the final statement predictably lacked specificity, it reinforced the reformist agenda of President Xi Jinping and signalled a gradual diminution of state control of all aspects of the economy in favour market influenced prices.

The importance of the plenum was always about the message it would send about momentum in the reform agenda and the ability of the new leadership to overcome resistance to reform. Beginning with an anti-corruption campaign that effectively discredited political opponents, most notably Bo Xilai, and generated popular support, the government has progressed reforms in foreign direct investment policy and interest rate deregulation. It has also had the confidence to permit an economic slowdown. The board pronouncements from the plenum indicate that this momentum will be sustained.

The report signals the development of a more balanced policy towards the public and private sectors; the maintenance of government to commitment to state owned enterprises combined with the development of "fair, open and transparent" market rules for the economy.

Exceeding expectations, the texts from the plenum show the government understands that systemic reform is a pre-requisite for making China’s economic system more sustainable. Judicial structural reform is called for along with changes to the Party’s internal oversight processes, thereby enhancing the role of central Party authorities. Enhancing the power of the judiciary’s at local levels could provide the government with a more effective mechanism to address corruption and force local implementation of policy directives, which would be positive for reform in the medium to long term.

Impediments posed by the two-tier land ownership system and the concept of equal land rights were also raised. At present, farmers moving to urban areas are unable to sell their land, in contrast to urban dwellers who are able to buy and sell property. It is anticipated that the distinction between urban and rural land will be abolished, a significant reform, that will take China a step further towards an economy driven by market forces.

While businesses can take many positives from pledges, albeit ambiguous, to protect the private economy, the crucial issues of interest rates, the floating of the renminbi or banking sector reform, were not publicly mentioned. This shouldn’t be interpreted as a sign that no action will be taken; rather that the government is leaving itself significant room for manoeuvre to implement policy reform in accordance with political and economic necessity.

While the pledge of greater protection for the private sector is a positive announcement from the leaders of the world’s second largest economy, many risks remain inherent in transacting business in country that lacks an independent judiciary and vibrant civil society.

Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing. Photograph: Getty Images.

JLT Head of Credit & Political Risk Advisory

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Theresa May’s stage-managed election campaign keeps the public at bay

Jeremy Corbyn’s approach may be chaotic, but at least it’s more authentic.

The worst part about running an election campaign for a politician? Having to meet the general public. Those ordinary folk can be a tricky lot, with their lack of regard for being on-message, and their pesky real-life concerns.

But it looks like Theresa May has decided to avoid this inconvenience altogether during this snap general election campaign, as it turns out her visit to Leeds last night was so stage-managed that she barely had to face the public.

Accusations have been whizzing around online that at a campaign event at the Shine building in Leeds, the Prime Minister spoke to a room full of guests invited by the party, rather than local people or people who work in the building’s office space.

The Telegraph’s Chris Hope tweeted a picture of the room in which May was addressing her audience yesterday evening a little before 7pm. He pointed out that, being in Leeds, she was in “Labour territory”:

But a few locals who spied this picture online claimed that the audience did not look like who you’d expect to see congregated at Shine – a grade II-listed Victorian school that has been renovated into a community project housing office space and meeting rooms.

“Ask why she didn’t meet any of the people at the business who work in that beautiful building. Everyone there was an invite-only Tory,” tweeted Rik Kendell, a Leeds-based developer and designer who says he works in the Shine building. “She didn’t arrive until we’d all left for the day. Everyone in the building past 6pm was invite-only . . . They seemed to seek out the most clinical corner for their PR photos. Such a beautiful building to work in.”

Other tweeters also found the snapshot jarring:

Shine’s founders have pointed out that they didn’t host or invite Theresa May – rather the party hired out the space for a private event: “All visitors pay for meeting space in Shine and we do not seek out, bid for, or otherwise host any political parties,” wrote managing director Dawn O'Keefe. The guestlist was not down to Shine, but to the Tory party.

The audience consisted of journalists and around 150 Tory activists, according to the Guardian. This was instead of employees from the 16 offices housed in the building. I have asked the Conservative Party for clarification of who was in the audience and whether it was invite-only and am awaiting its response.

Jeremy Corbyn accused May of “hiding from the public”, and local Labour MP Richard Burgon commented that, “like a medieval monarch, she simply briefly relocated her travelling court of admirers to town and then moved on without so much as a nod to the people she considers to be her lowly subjects”.

But it doesn’t look like the Tories’ painstaking stage-management is a fool-proof plan. Having uniform audiences of the party faithful on the campaign trail seems to be confusing the Prime Minister somewhat. During a visit to a (rather sparsely populated) factory in Clay Cross, Derbyshire, yesterday, she appeared to forget where exactly on the campaign trail she was:

The management of Corbyn’s campaign has also resulted in gaffes – but for opposite reasons. A slightly more chaotic approach has led to him facing the wrong way, with his back to the cameras.

Corbyn’s blunder is born out of his instinct to address the crowd rather than the cameras – May’s problem is the other way round. Both, however, seem far more comfortable talking to the party faithful, even if they are venturing out of safe seat territory.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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