Regulation doesn't need to be a millstone

We need a properly managed recovery.

There has finally been something to cheer about in recent weeks. The economy seems to be experiencing some meaningful growth, unemployment appears to be dropping across the country and the property sector is at long last out of the doldrums. All in all, with the winter months fast approaching, it seems that the "green shoots" we’ve heard so much talk about over the past few years are finally beginning to germinate.

As we all know, tied to all the economic woes of recent times is the property sector. Property represents a huge proportion of the UK’s wealth and when the sector starts to suffer, so too does everything else. In the same way that we need a healthy banking sector to support the nation’s businesses, we need a healthy property and construction sector to build our homes, maintain our roads and make sure our assets are correctly valued. In a nutshell, property makes the world go around.

We know that the Coalition Government is reluctant to create new laws or legislation, seeing it as a potential burden on business. It is for this reason that they’ve pushed ahead with the likes of the Red Tape Challenge, since so many large firms have cited "regulation" as a cost holding back their growth plans. In this environment, professional standards and ethics, created by professional institutions, are all the more important.

We need specialists operating to regulated professional standards and guidance to protect against things like projects coming in way over budget or homes not being built properly. Ministers rightly say the state can’t do everything, and nor would we want it to; they turn to the professional institutions and their members to provide guidance and certainty. The standards set by RICS for its members safeguard against these things and are the sort of thing we’re going to need if we’re going to have a lively yet sustainable property sector powering our economy.

Regulation does not need to be a millstone around the neck of the long-awaited recovery. With an effectively regulated, ethical property sector driving the UK forward, it is not green shoots that we’re looking to in twenty years, but a blooming garden.

Photograph: Getty Images

Mark Walley is Regional Managing Director of RICS EMEA.

Show Hide image

Appreciate the full horror of Nigel Farage's pro-Trump speech

The former Ukip leader has appeared at a Donald Trump rally. It went exactly as you would expect.

It is with a heavy heart that I must announce Nigel Farage is at it again.

The on-again, off-again Ukip leader and current Member of the European Parliament has appeared at a Donald Trump rally to lend his support to the presidential candidate.

It was, predictably, distressing.

Farage started by telling his American audience why they, like he, should be positive.

"I come to you from the United Kingdom"

Okay, good start. Undeniably true.

"– with a message of hope –

Again, probably quite true.

Image: Clearly hopeful (Wikipedia Screenshot)

– and optimism.”

Ah.

Image: Nigel Farage in front of a poster showing immigrants who are definitely not European (Getty)

He continues: “If the little people, if the real people–”

Wait, what?

Why is Trump nodding sagely at this?

The little people?

Image: It's a plane with the name Trump on it (Wikimedia Commons)

THE LITTLE PEOPLE?

Image: It's the word Trump on the side of a skyscraper I can't cope with this (Pixel)

THE ONLY LITTLE PERSON CLOSE TO TRUMP IS RIDING A MASSIVE STUFFED LION

Image: I don't even know what to tell you. It's Trump and his wife and a child riding a stuffed lion. 

IN A PENTHOUSE

A PENTHOUSE WHICH LOOKS LIKE LIBERACE WAS LET LOOSE WITH THE GILT ON DAY FIVE OF A PARTICULARLY BAD BENDER

Image: So much gold. Just gold, everywhere.

HIS WIFE HAS SO MANY BAGS SHE HAS TO EMPLOY A BAG MAN TO CARRY THEM

Image: I did not even know there were so many styles of Louis Vuitton, and my dentists has a lot of old copies of Vogue.

Anyway. Back to Farage, who is telling the little people that they can win "against the forces of global corporatism".

 

Image: Aaaaarggghhhh (Wikipedia Screenshot)

Ugh. Okay. What next? Oh god, he's telling them they can have a Brexit moment.

“... you can beat Washington...”

“... if enough decent people...”

“...are prepared to stand up against the establishment”

Image: A screenshot from Donald Trump's Wikipedia page.

I think I need a lie down.

Watch the full clip here:

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland