Millionaire men don't like millionaire women

"Bossy, middle-aged millionaires" only attractive to women.

Millionaire men prefer to date non-millionaire women as they don’t like to be challenged by their partners, while HNW women are more likely to be interested in men with the same level of wealth.

That’s according to a survey of 15,000 individuals by Millionaire Match, an online dating website that claims it only has wealthy members, including CEOs, entrepreneurs and professional athletes, as well as beauty queens, models and celebrities.

The research confirmed the stereotype of men not being able to be around powerful women, as it found that 79.6 per cent of the men surveyed wanted to date less wealthy women, while 84.5 per cent of the women interviewed preferred to go out with other fellow wealthy individuals.

When asked why, HNW men said they preferred "younger, attractive women" to a "bossy, middle-aged millionaire". Perhaps the same "reasoning" can explain why women represent only 17.4 per cent of directors of FTSE 100 companies.

Women, however, said they wanted to remain in control of their finances and were not interested in "carrying the whole financial burden". One of the women surveyed – who said to be worth more than $100m – said she was "not looking to take care of anybody". 

Giulia Cambieri writes for Spears

This piece first appeared on Spear's Magazine

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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.