Five questions answered on the UK’s GDP growth

How is the economy fairing?

The UK’s GDP has seen its fastest growth for three years latest figures have revealed. We answer five questions on the statistics. 

How much has the UK’s economic output grown by? 

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) UK economic output rose by 0.8 per cent between July and September.

This is the best quarterly performance since 2010.

What other figures were released?

The ONS said production grew by 0.5 per cent, however this is 12.8 per cent off its 2008 level. Within this manufacturing improved by 0.9 per cent.

The service sector grew by 0.7 per cent and is now 0.6 per cent above its pre-crisis peak. This represents three-quarters of economic output. 

What has the government had to say about these latest figures?

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne tweeted: "This shows that Britain's hard work is paying off & the country is on the path to prosperity."

While the Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg said the figures "show that we are firmly on the road to economic recovery".

And the experts?

The Institute of Directors' chief economist Graeme Leach told the BBC: "The outlook looks better than at any time since the onset of the financial crisis. Indeed, our members have more confidence in the economy than at any time since 2008.

"However, strong headwinds remain and the annual growth rate year on year is nothing to get too excited about yet. Though inflationary pressures are likely to remain benign, debt and inflation are rising faster than earnings.

"This stage of our economic recovery is likely to be short and sweet, instead of long and strong."

The director-general of the British Chambers of Commerce, John Longworth, said: "This is the highest quarterly increase we've seen in three years, so the economy is clearly moving in the right direction.

"But we are still behind a number of advanced economies, such as the US and Germany, that have managed to recover the output lost during the economic downturn.

So, how does the economy fair overall?

The economy remains 2.5 per cent below its pre-recession peak at the start of 2008, and 1.5 per cent ahead of the same period last year. 

On the road to recovery? Photograph: Getty Images.

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

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Keir Starmer's Brexit diary: Why doesn't David Davis want to answer my questions?

The shadow Brexit secretary on the resignation of Sir Ivan Rogers, the Prime Minister's speech and tracking down his opposite in government. 

My Brexit diary starts with a week of frustration and anticipation. 

Following the resignation of Sir Ivan Rogers, I asked that David Davis come to Parliament on the first day back after recess to make a statement. My concern was not so much the fact of Ivan’s resignation, but the basis – his concern that the government still had not agreed negotiating terms and so the UKRep team in Brussels was under-prepared for the challenge ahead. Davis refused to account, and I was deprived of the opportunity to question him. 

However, concerns about the state of affairs described by Rogers did prompt the Prime Minister to promise a speech setting out more detail of her approach to Brexit. Good, we’ve had precious little so far! The speech is now scheduled for Tuesday. Whether she will deliver clarity and reassurance remains to be seen. 

The theme of the week was certainly the single market; the question being what the PM intends to give up on membership, as she hinted in her otherwise uninformative Sophy Ridge interview. If she does so in her speech on Tuesday, she needs to set out in detail what she sees the alternative being, that safeguards jobs and the economy. 

For my part, I’ve had the usual week of busy meetings in and out of Parliament, including an insightful roundtable with a large number of well-informed experts organised by my friend and neighbour Charles Grant, who directs the Centre for European Reform. I also travelled to Derby and Wakefield to speak to businesses, trade unions, and local representatives, as I have been doing across the country in the last 3 months. 

Meanwhile, no word yet on when the Supreme Court will give its judgement in the Article 50 case. What we do know is that when it happens things will begin to move very fast! 

More next week. 

Keir