Five questions answered on the UK’s GDP growth

How is the economy fairing?

The UK’s GDP has seen its fastest growth for three years latest figures have revealed. We answer five questions on the statistics. 

How much has the UK’s economic output grown by? 

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) UK economic output rose by 0.8 per cent between July and September.

This is the best quarterly performance since 2010.

What other figures were released?

The ONS said production grew by 0.5 per cent, however this is 12.8 per cent off its 2008 level. Within this manufacturing improved by 0.9 per cent.

The service sector grew by 0.7 per cent and is now 0.6 per cent above its pre-crisis peak. This represents three-quarters of economic output. 

What has the government had to say about these latest figures?

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne tweeted: "This shows that Britain's hard work is paying off & the country is on the path to prosperity."

While the Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg said the figures "show that we are firmly on the road to economic recovery".

And the experts?

The Institute of Directors' chief economist Graeme Leach told the BBC: "The outlook looks better than at any time since the onset of the financial crisis. Indeed, our members have more confidence in the economy than at any time since 2008.

"However, strong headwinds remain and the annual growth rate year on year is nothing to get too excited about yet. Though inflationary pressures are likely to remain benign, debt and inflation are rising faster than earnings.

"This stage of our economic recovery is likely to be short and sweet, instead of long and strong."

The director-general of the British Chambers of Commerce, John Longworth, said: "This is the highest quarterly increase we've seen in three years, so the economy is clearly moving in the right direction.

"But we are still behind a number of advanced economies, such as the US and Germany, that have managed to recover the output lost during the economic downturn.

So, how does the economy fair overall?

The economy remains 2.5 per cent below its pre-recession peak at the start of 2008, and 1.5 per cent ahead of the same period last year. 

On the road to recovery? Photograph: Getty Images.

Heidi Vella is a features writer for

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Why a group of Brunel students walked out on Katie Hopkins instead of no-platforming her

"We silently walked out because Ms Hopkins has the right to speak, but we also have the right to express our discontent."

Earlier this week, columnist and all-round provocateur Katie Hopkins turned up to Brunel University to join a panel in debating whether the welfare state has a place in 2015. No prizes for guessing her stance on this particular issue

But as Hopkins began her speech, something odd happened. Around 50 students stood up and left, leaving the hall half-empty.

Here's the video:

As soon as Hopkins begins speaking, some students stand up with their backs to the panelists. Then, they all leave - as the nonplussed chair asks them to "please return to their seats". 

The walk-out was, in fact, pre-planned by the student union as an act of protest against Hopkins' appearance at an event held as part of the University's 50th anniversary celebrations. 

Ali Milani, the Brunel Student Union president, says he and other students knew the walk-out would "start a conversation" around no-platforming on campuses, but as he points out, "What is often overlooked (either purposely or as a result of the fanfare) is that the conversation at no point has been about banning Ms Hopkins from speaking on campus, or denying her right to speak."

Instead, students who found her appearance at the welfare debate "incongruous" and "distasteful" simply left the room: "We silently walked out because Ms Hopkins has the right to speak, but we also have the right to express our discontent."

Milani praised the student body for treading the line between freedom of speech and expressing their distaste at Brunel's decision: 

"They have respectfully voiced their antagonism at the decision of their institution, but also . . . proven their commitment to free of speech and freedom of expression."

The protest was an apt way to dodge the issues of free speech surrounding no-platforming, while rejecting Hopkins' views. A walk-out symbolises the fact that we aren't obliged to listen to people like Hopkins. She is free to speak, of course, albeit to empty chairs. 

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.