Five questions answered on Tesco’s profit drop

Still the Uk's biggest chain.

The UK’s biggest supermarket chain, Tesco, has announced a significant drop in profit during the first half of the year. We answer five questions on Tesco’s profit woes.

By how much has Tesco’s profit dropped by?

Today the company reported a 23.3 per cent drop in profits during the first half of its financial year. The company blamed a challenging retail environment, especially in Europe.

The firm’s pre-tax profits in the six months to 24 August were £1.39bn.

UK like-for-like sales, excluding new store openings, fell by 0.5 per cent.

Tesco is a global company, how does this profit fall reflect in different area of its business?

 The supermarket giant said profits fell 67 per cent in Europe to £55m, while Asian profits, excluding China, dropped 7.4 per cent to £314m.

However, UK trading profits rose 1.5 per cent to £1.13bn.

Group profit margins fell from 5.4 per cent to 4.9 per cent.

What has Tesco said about these latest figures?

Chief executive, Philip Clarke, speaking to the BBC said:

"There is less pessimism around, but customers are still not seeing real disposable incomes improve.

"They are, perhaps, feeling a little better about the future.”

What have the experts said?

Neil Saunders, managing director of retail consultants Conlumino, speaking to the news broadcaster said:

"…it is fair to say that Tesco is making some progress, especially on the UK front," he said.

"However, they also indicate some more worrying signs that there are a number of deep seated issues on the international scene that need to be addressed."

How are Tesco’s competitors doing?

In this fiercely competitive market Tesco is still the UK’s biggest chain. However, rival Sainsbury's reported a 2 per cent rise in like-for-like sales during the second quarter of its financial year.

While Aldi saw UK pre-tax profits surge 124 per cent to £157.9m in 2012.

Sainsbury's chief executive Justin King said Sainsbury’s was the only major supermarket chain increasing its market share.

"Our groceries online business grew by over 15 per cent in the quarter and is now worth over £1bn in annual sales." he said.

"Our convenience business grew 20 per cent year-on-year as customers topped up more frequently during the warm summer weather."

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for

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France to bulldoze Calais Jungle days after child refugees arrive in the UK

The camp houses thousands. 

Refugees and migrants in Calais began queuing up for buses this morning as the French authorities plan to demolish the "Jungle" camp.

But activists fear that, unless France significantly speeds up its asylum process, the displaced people will simply move to other camps along the northern French coast.

Meanwhile, the first children of Calais brought to the UK under the Dubs Amendment arrived at the weekend.

The camp known as the Jungle, in a wasteland by the port of Calais, is actually the latest manifestation in a series of camps established since 1999, when a French reception centre became too crowded.

However, it has swelled as a result of the refugee crisis, and attempts by residents to sneak onto lorries entering the Channel Tunnel have become daily occurences. The French authorities bulldozed part of it earlier this year.

Ahead of the latest demolishment, which is expected to happen on Tuesday, Clare Moseley, founder of Care4Calais, said: “In February this year over 50 per cent of the camp was demolished and yet six months later the camp is bigger than it has ever been before. 

"This is clear evidence that demolitions do not act as a deterrent.  The refugees come because they have no choice."

Future refugees will go to other camps with even less facilities, she warned.

The camp houses thousands of residents, but because of the authorities' unwillingness to legitimise it, there is no official presence. Instead, the residents must rely on volunteer aid services and have little means to stop intruders entering. 

Although conditions in the camp can be dire, residents have created a high street with basic tent shops and restaurants catering to the needs of its displaced population. Many of those in the camp say they are there because they hope to be reunited with family in Britain, or they have given up on ever being processed by the French authorities. 

After the UK government was pressurised into passing the Dubs Amendment, which provides sanctuary to unaccompanied child refugees, some children from the camp have arrived in the UK. The first group is reportedly mostly girls from Eritrea, who will be processed at a UK immigration centre.

One of the MPs crucial to ensuring the Dubs Amendment delivered, Stella Creasy, said many more still needed help. 

Children reunited with their families under the Dublin Convention arrived in the UK last week, although their arrival was overshadowed by a debate over age checks.  

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.