Five questions answered on Tesco’s profit drop

Still the Uk's biggest chain.

The UK’s biggest supermarket chain, Tesco, has announced a significant drop in profit during the first half of the year. We answer five questions on Tesco’s profit woes.

By how much has Tesco’s profit dropped by?

Today the company reported a 23.3 per cent drop in profits during the first half of its financial year. The company blamed a challenging retail environment, especially in Europe.

The firm’s pre-tax profits in the six months to 24 August were £1.39bn.

UK like-for-like sales, excluding new store openings, fell by 0.5 per cent.

Tesco is a global company, how does this profit fall reflect in different area of its business?

 The supermarket giant said profits fell 67 per cent in Europe to £55m, while Asian profits, excluding China, dropped 7.4 per cent to £314m.

However, UK trading profits rose 1.5 per cent to £1.13bn.

Group profit margins fell from 5.4 per cent to 4.9 per cent.

What has Tesco said about these latest figures?

Chief executive, Philip Clarke, speaking to the BBC said:

"There is less pessimism around, but customers are still not seeing real disposable incomes improve.

"They are, perhaps, feeling a little better about the future.”

What have the experts said?

Neil Saunders, managing director of retail consultants Conlumino, speaking to the news broadcaster said:

"…it is fair to say that Tesco is making some progress, especially on the UK front," he said.

"However, they also indicate some more worrying signs that there are a number of deep seated issues on the international scene that need to be addressed."

How are Tesco’s competitors doing?

In this fiercely competitive market Tesco is still the UK’s biggest chain. However, rival Sainsbury's reported a 2 per cent rise in like-for-like sales during the second quarter of its financial year.

While Aldi saw UK pre-tax profits surge 124 per cent to £157.9m in 2012.

Sainsbury's chief executive Justin King said Sainsbury’s was the only major supermarket chain increasing its market share.

"Our groceries online business grew by over 15 per cent in the quarter and is now worth over £1bn in annual sales." he said.

"Our convenience business grew 20 per cent year-on-year as customers topped up more frequently during the warm summer weather."

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

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An alternative Trainspotting script for John Humphrys’ Radio 4 “Choose Life” tribute

Born chippy.

Your mole often has Radio 4’s Today programme babbling away comfortingly in the background while emerging blinking from the burrow. So imagine its horror this morning, when the BBC decided to sully this listening experience with John Humphrys doing the “Choose Life” monologue from Trainspotting.

“I chose not to choose life: I chose something else. And the reasons? There are no reasons. Who needs reasons when you’ve got Radio 4?” he concluded, as a nation cringed.

Introduced as someone who has “taken issue with modernity”, Humphrys launched into the film character Renton’s iconic rant against the banality of modern life.

But Humphrys’ role as in-studio curmudgeon is neither endearing nor amusing to this mole. Often tasked with stories about modern technology and digital culture by supposedly mischievous editors, Humphrys sounds increasingly cranky and ill-informed. It doesn’t exactly make for enlightening interviews. So your mole has tampered with the script. Here’s what he should have said:

“Choose life. Choose a job and then never retire, ever. Choose a career defined by growling and scoffing. Choose crashing the pips three mornings out of five. Choose a fucking long contract. Choose interrupting your co-hosts, politicians, religious leaders and children. Choose sitting across the desk from Justin Webb at 7.20 wondering what you’re doing with your life. Choose confusion about why Thought for the Day is still a thing. Choose hogging political interviews. Choose anxiety about whether Jim Naughtie’s departure means there’s dwindling demand for grouchy old men on flagship political radio shows. Choose a staunch commitment to misunderstanding stories about video games and emoji. Choose doing those stories anyway. Choose turning on the radio and wondering why the fuck you aren’t on on a Sunday morning as well. Choose sitting on that black leather chair hosting mind-numbing spirit-crushing game shows (Mastermind). Choose going over time at the end of it all, pishing your last few seconds on needlessly combative questions, nothing more than an obstacle to that day’s editors being credited. Choose your future. Choose life . . .”

I'm a mole, innit.