Five questions answered on the drop in UK retail sales in August

Why the fall?

According to figures from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) retail volumes fell in August despite analysts expecting a rise. We answer five questions on the surprise drop.

By how much did retail sales fall in August?

They fell by 0.9 per cent according to the ONS. This was a surprise for analysts who expected a 0.4 per cent increase.

What’s responsible for the fall?

The ONS said the fall was due to consumers reining in spending, particularly on food.

Sales of food fell by 2.7 per cent in August compared with the month before.

Morrisons last week said higher levels of spending it had seen in London were not reflected in other parts of the country.

How do August’s figures compare to last year?

These latest figures, which are based on a monthly survey of 5,000 UK retailers including all large retailers who employ 100 people or more, are still up on the same time last year.

They’re 2.1 per cent higher than August last year, when the Olympics affected spending.

What does this all mean in relation to the economy?

Retail figures are considered an indicator of consumer confidence and the economy as a whole. The retail sector actually accounts for around 6 per cent of the UK economy.

However, according to latest estimates the economy grew by 0.7 per cent in the second quarter of the year.

What do the analysts say?

David Tinsley, UK economist at BNP Paribas, speaking to the BBC said:

"It is probably a sign that upbeat expectations were getting a little out of whack with what the economy is capable of delivering," he said.

"If there is an ex-post rationale for the decline in sales, it seems to be largely down to the weather. Food sales were exceptionally strong in July... as the temperature improved markedly. While August was also pleasant, that level of sales was probably difficult to sustain."

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

Photo: Getty
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Gerald Kaufman dies aged 86

Before becoming an MP, Kaufman's varied career included a stint as the NS' theatre critic.

Gerald Kaufman, the Labour MP for Manchester Gorton and former theatre critic at the New Statesman, has died.

Kaufman, who served as the MP for Manchester Gorton continuously from 1970, had a varied career before entering Parliament, working for the Fabian Society in addition to his flourishing career in journalism and as a satirist, writing for That Was The Week That Was and as a leader writer on the Mirror. In 1965, he exchanged the press for politics, working as a press officer and an aide to Harold Wilson before he was elected to parliament in 1970.

Upon Labour’s return to office in 1974, he served as a junior minister until the party’s defeat in 1979, and on the opposition frontbenches until 1992, reaching the position of shadow foreign secretary. In 1999, he was chair of the Man Booker Prize, which that year was won by JM Coetzee’s Disgrace.

His death opens up a by-election in Manchester Gorton, which Labour is expected to win. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.