Five questions answered on Barclays’ plan to review its overdraft fees and charges

The breakdown.

Barclays bank has announced that it plans to conduct an unprecedented review of its overdraft fees and charges faced by 12 million of its current account customers. We answer five questions on the planned review.

What particular aspects will Barclays be looking at?

A key part of this new campaign will look at Barclays’ overdraft pricing.

The bank is already trialling a text alert service which alerts tens of thousands of customer when they are about to go into the red.

This service alone has cost the bank £1.5m in lost fees and is likely to be extended.

Why is Barclays conducting this review?

It is thought to be an attempt to improve its reputation after a being handed out a series of fines.

The bank has recently admitted it is likely to suffer a £50m fine for its Qatari bailout.

It was revealed recently that the bank failed to declare it paid £322 million to the Qataris for bailing the bank out in 2008.

It also said that it may have to compensate 300,000 personal loan customers who were given the wrong paperwork for five years. 

The bank also came last in an ethical poll by campaigners Move Your Money, scoring just four out of 100 for its honesty and service.

How will the bank work out its new policy?

Earlier this month the bank launched a ‘Your Bank’ initiative asking customers to give honest feedback.

So far 250,000 people have got in touch.

A new overdraft policy will be worked out over the next 90 to 120 days.

How much does the bank currently charge its customers who go overdrawn?

It charges £88 for savers that persistently fall into an unauthorised overdraft during the month. However, the more common charge is £22 which usually occurs when a payment takes a customer into their unauthorized overdraft and another subsequent payment is made.

What has the Barclay’s Chief Executive said?

Speaking to The Telegraph, Ashok Vaswani, Barclays' retail and business banking chief executive said: "I'm going through the business with a fine toothcomb. We want to de-risk the business and clean up any sins of the past."

"The biggest one for me is overdrafts. I'm going to do a full grass roots review of our overdraft proposition. We know that this has been a problem which is why we have already launched the text alert systems in real time.

"I firmly believe that once a customer has been given the opportunity to save £22 they will say to themselves: "This bank is looking out for me".

Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

Photo: Getty
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Shock Wales YouGov poll shows that Labour's Ukip nightmare is coming true

The fear that voting Ukip would prove a gateway drug for Labour voters appears to be being borne out. 

An astonishing new poll for the Cardiff University Governance Centre and ITV Cymru shows a historic result: the Conservatives ending a 167-year wait for an election victory in Wales.

The numbers that matter:

Conservatives: 40 per cent

Labour: 30 per cent

Plaid Cymru: 13 per cent

Liberal Democrats: 8 per cent

Ukip: 6 per cent

Others: 3 per cent

And for context, here’s what happened in 2015:

Labour 36.9 per cent

Conservatives 27.2 per cent

Ukip 13.6 per cent

Plaid Cymru 12.1 per cent

Liberal Democrat 6.5 per cent

Others 2.6 per cent

There’s a lot to note here. If repeated at a general election, this would mean Labour losing an election in Wales for the first time since the First World War. In addition to losing the popular vote, they would shed ten seats to the Tories.

We're talking about a far more significant reverse than merely losing the next election. 

I don’t want to detract from how bad the Labour performance is in a vacuum – they have lost 6.9 per cent of their vote on 2015, in any case the worst election performance for Labour in Wales since the rout of 1983.  But the really terrifying thing for Labour is not what is happening to their own vote, though that is pretty terrifying.

It’s what’s happened to the Conservative vote – growing in almost every direction. There is some direct Labour to Tory slippage. But the big problem is the longtime fear of Labour MPs – that voting for Ukip would be a gateway drug to voting for the mainstream right – appears to be being realised. Don't forget that most of the Ukip vote in Wales is drawn from people who voted Labour in 2010. (The unnoticed shift of the 2010-5 parliament in a lot of places was a big chunk of the Labour 2010 vote went to Ukip, but was replaced by a chunk of the 2010 Liberal Democrat vote.) 

If repeated across the United Kingdom, the Tory landslide will be larger than the 114 majority suggested by the polls and a simple national swing.

As I’ve said before, polls are useful, but they are not the be-all and end-all. The bad news is that this very much supports the pattern at elections since the referendum – Labour falling back, the Tories losing some votes to the Liberal Democrats but more than making up the loss thanks to the collapse of Ukip.

The word from Welsh Labour is that these figures “look about right” at least as far as the drop in the Labour vote, though of course they have no idea what is going on with their opponents’ vote share. As for the Conservatives, their early experiences on the doorstep do show the Ukip vote collapsing to their benefit.

One Labour MP said to me a few days again that they knew their vote was holding up – what they didn’t know was what was happening to their opponents. That’s particularly significant if you have a “safe seat” but less than 50 per cent of the vote.

Wales has local elections throughout the country on 4 May. They should provide an early sign whether these world-shaking figures are really true. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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