Why is India's currency on the slide?

New low against the dollar today.

The Indian rupee crashed to a new low against the US dollar today as foreign investors continued to pull their money out of the country. Following a slump of 3 per cent today, the rupee has now depreciated by 24 per cent this year from 55 per dollar at the end of 2012 to 68 per dollar currently.

According to Timetric wealth analyst Shekhar Tripathi the depreciation is being caused by a number of factors. These include rising oil prices and a high current account deficit. He stated "the price of crude puts tremendous stress on the Indian Rupee as India has to import the bulk of its oil requirements in order to satisfy local demand."

A lack of government reform has also been highlighted as a contributing factor as the Indian government could have introduced far more reforms during the boom years between 2003 and 2008. Instead they failed to sufficiently build infrastructure or liberalize markets for labour, energy and land during this period and now it is far more difficult to source investment for this.

According to Progressive Media analyst Sunil Agarwal "the lack of economic reform and political paralysis was a major cause of the recent depreciation with the Reserve Bank of India sending out mixed signals on monetary policy".

He also pointed to the recent recovery in the US which has encouraged US investors to pull their money out of emerging markets and invest more money onshore.

India’s problems are not limited to the recent depreciation. Despite relatively strong growth over the past decade India remains one of the poorest countries in the world with the bulk of the population still living below the poverty line.

According to the latest Credit Suisse Wealth Book India’s wealth per capita amounted to US$2,560 per person at the end of 2012 which is well below the worldwide average of US$31,500. It also compares poorly to other major emerging markets such as China (US$15,000) and Brazil (US$16,500) and perhaps most alarming it is well below the fast growing Indonesia (US$7,100).

The Indian rupee crashed to a new low against the US dollar today. Photograph: Getty Images

Andrew Amoils is a writer for WealthInsight

David Cameron addresses pupils at an assembly during a visit to Corby Technical School on September 2, 2015. Photograph: Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Can Cameron maintain his refugee stance as he comes under attack from all sides?

Tory MPs, the Sun, Labour and a growing section of the public are calling on the PM to end his refusal to take "more and more". 

The disparity between the traumatic images of drowned Syrian children and David Cameron's compassionless response ("I don't think there is an answer that can be achieved simply by taking more and more refugees") has triggered a political backlash. A petition calling for greater action (the UK has to date accepted around 5,000) has passed the 100,000 threshold required for the government to consider a debate after tens of thousands signed this morning. Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson has tweeted: "This is not an immigration issue, it's a humanitarian one, and the human response must be to help. If we don't, what does that make us?" Tory MPs such as Nicola Blackwood, David Burrowes, Jeremy Lefroy and Johnny Mercer have similarly appealed to Cameron to reverse his stance.

Today's Sun declares that the UK has "a proud record of taking in desperate people and we should not flinch from it now if it is beyond doubt that they have fled for their lives." Meanwhile, the Washington Post has published a derisive piece headlined "Britain takes in so few refugees from Syria they would fit on a subway train". Labour has called on Cameron to convene a meeting of Cobra to discuss the crisis and to request an emergency EU summit. Yvette Cooper, who led the way with a speech on Monday outlining how the UK could accept 10,000 refugees, is organising a meeting of councils, charities and faith groups to discuss Britain's response. Public opinion, which can turn remarkably quickly in response to harrowing images, is likely to have grown more sympathetic to the Syrians' plight. Indeed, a survey in March found that those who supported accepting refugees fleeing persecution outnumbered opponents by 47-24 per cent. 

The political question is whether this cumulative pressure will force Cameron to change his stance. He may not agree to match Cooper's demand of 10,000 (though Germany is poised to accept 800,000) but an increasing number at Westminster believe that he cannot remain impassive. Surely Cameron, who will not stand for election again, will not want this stain on his premiership? The UK's obstinacy is further antagonising Angela Merkel on whom his hopes of a successful EU renegotiation rest. If nothing else, Cameron should remember one of the laws of politics: the earlier a climbdown, the less painful it is. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.