Why are foreign investments in the UK rising?

Is it just the weather?

There is some good news for the UK taxman this summer. First, the country actually had a summer. It even fell on a Sunday, as a colleague pointed out. Second, according to the Office for National Statistics, this year Brits are happier. The Jubilee played its part, a report suggests.

And this is not all: while Jubileeing first and waiting for RB immediately afterwards, foreign investments have also increased, according to the Inward Investment Report 2012/2013 presented by government agency UK Trade & Investment (UKTI).

The UKTI says that while global Foreign Direct Investment inflows declined by 18 per cent, inflows into the UK experienced a 22 per cent year on year increase.

"The UK has received a major vote of confidence from foreign investors confirming that the UK remains a world leading business destination,” says Trade and Investment Minister Lord Green, adding that "attracting foreign investment is an important element of the UK Government’s economic and growth programme."

Between Olympic and Royal fever the UK reached the peak of its marketing capabilities in the past two years. But what supported this powerful business card?

The World Bank ranks the UK among the top countries for ease of doing business. It considers elements such as the 13 days on average to set up a business or the 24 hours necessary to register a company.

The UKTI claims that the removal and reduction of "red tape’" has already saved UK-based businesses approximately £1bn in the last two years. It also highlights the advantages of a flexible labour market and of a "highly competitive tax environment", with the main rate of corporation tax being reduced to 21 per cent in 2014 and 20 per cent in 2015 – the lowest rate in the G7 and the joint lowest in the G20.

A sunny picture to indulge in during the summer.

The strengths of this chapter of the UK economy are reflected in the identikit of its main investors: North America and Japan, but also India and China, across very different sectors. Altogether Britain has attracted 1,559 projects, 11 per cent more than the previous year and the UKTI estimates these investments have generated 170,000 jobs.

Foreigners are particularly keen in investing in software and computer services, which, with 17 per cent of projects, represent the largest slice of the cake. Financial and business services are the second most attractive, but the broad range of investments includes creative and media services, biotechnology and pharmaceuticals and renewable energy.

Emerging economies are investing from scratch and buying British companies, but it’s the comparison with other EU member states that can work as a litmus test of the real strengths of the Brits.

Investments from French and German companies have increased by 43 and 18 per cent respectively.

Despite a 5 per cent reduction, Italy is, together with France, the third foreign investor.

Italians are attracted by the political and economic stability. No wonder, as the waiting for the Royal Baby has been equalled only by the waiting in the past days for the outcome of the final sentence on former PM Berlusconi.

A legislation that encourages innovation is also considered a reason to invest in the UK, together with an open market that makes it easy to access talent.

"Italian companies increasingly see the UK as the ideal destination to grow, succeed and access international opportunities. The exceptional Italian results reflect the capacity for recovery of the country and of its profound entrepreneurial roots, as well as its industrial excellence," says British consul for Milan Vic Annels.

This sounds a bit as if we’ve got it all, apart from a couple of fundamental things, but as our governments are busy at the moment, we’ll come at yours.

Interestingly, the reasons given to support this choice highlight some historical weaknesses of other European countries (it is probably worth mentioning that the UK is in Europe as well) and some historical strengths of the British system more than a renewed economic epiphany.

So, after all this sun, let’s not forget the role of rain in growing awareness: the UK has been dynamic and successful in attracting foreign investors. But this is only a chapter of the economy and the Royal baby is going to cry a lot before becoming a king.

Photograph: Getty Images

Sara Perria is the Assistant Editor for Banking and Payments, VRL Financial News

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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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