There'll be a new bank account switching service in September

Five questions answered.

The Payments Council has announced a new bank account switching service that will start on the 16 September. We answer five questions on the new scheme. 

What does the new service do exactly?

It enables current account holders to switch banks within seven days instead of up to 30 days. 

As of Monday 16th September, 33 bank and building societies brands – accounting for virtually 100 per cent of the current account marketplace – will deliver the new switching service for consumers, small charities and small businesses.

How will it work exactly?

After the start date, when switching accounts the new provider will arrange for all direct debits and standing orders to be redirected to the new account. This system will stay in place for 13 months so no one off payments are missed.

Payments going in will also be redirected.

Why is the Payments Council launching this service?

It is being launched as a recommendation from the Independent Commission on Banking two years ago. The commission said that people only changed bank accounts once every 26 years on average.

As a result, the so-called "big four" High Street banks - Lloyds Banking Group, Barclays, Royal Bank of Scotland and HSBC - retain control over the market.

If it’s easier to switch, will banks be offering more incentives?

Yes! Two banks are already offering customers a cash incentive of up to £125 to switch their current accounts to them.

Will this new service provide a boost for smaller banks?

That’s one of the aims. Small banks taking place include the Reliance Bank, which is part of the Salvation Army – it has just one branch. Plus the Cumberland Building Society, which has 34 branches based across Cumbria and the north-west of England.

Payments Council has announced a new bank account switching service. Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

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How the Lib Dems learned to love all-women shortlists

Yes, the sitting Lib Dem MPs are mostly white, middle-aged middle class men. But the party's not taking any chances. 

I can’t tell you who’ll be the Lib Dem candidate in Southport on 8 June, but I do know one thing about them. As they’re replacing a sitting Lib Dem (John Pugh is retiring) - they’ll be female.

The same is true in many of our top 20 target seats, including places like Lewes (Kelly-Marie Blundell), Yeovil (Daisy Benson), Thornbury and Yate (Clare Young), and Sutton and Cheam (Amna Ahmad). There was air punching in Lib Dem offices all over the country on Tuesday when it was announced Jo Swinson was standing again in East Dunbartonshire.

And while every current Lib Dem constituency MP will get showered with love and attention in the campaign, one will get rather more attention than most - it’s no coincidence that Tim Farron’s first stop of the campaign was in Richmond Park, standing side by side with Sarah Olney.

How so?

Because the party membership took a long look at itself after the 2015 election - and a rather longer look at the eight white, middle-aged middle class men (sorry chaps) who now formed the Parliamentary party and said - "we’ve really got to sort this out".

And so after decades of prevarication, we put a policy in place to deliberately increase the diversity of candidates.

Quietly, over the last two years, the Liberal Democrats have been putting candidates into place in key target constituencies . There were more than 300 in total before this week’s general election call, and many of them have been there for a year or more. And they’ve been selected under new procedures adopted at Lib Dem Spring Conference in 2016, designed to deliberately promote the diversity of candidates in winnable seats

This includes mandating all-women shortlists when selecting candidates who are replacing sitting MPs, similar rules in our strongest electoral regions. In our top 10 per cent of constituencies, there is a requirement that at least two candidates are shortlisted from underrepresented groups on every list. We became the first party to reserve spaces on the shortlists of winnable seats for underrepresented candidates including women, BAME, LGBT+ and disabled candidates

It’s not going to be perfect - the hugely welcome return of Lib Dem grandees like Vince Cable, Ed Davey and Julian Huppert to their old stomping grounds will strengthen the party but not our gender imbalance. But excluding those former MPs coming back to the fray, every top 20 target constituency bar one has to date selected a female candidate.

Equality (together with liberty and community) is one of the three key values framed in the preamble to the Lib Dem constitution. It’s a relief that after this election, the Liberal Democratic party in the Commons will reflect that aspiration rather better than it has done in the past.

Richard Morris blogs at A View From Ham Common, which was named Best New Blog at the 2011 Lib Dem Conference

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