Sky News cameraman killed in Eqypt

Mick Dean was shot while covering protests in Cairo.

A Sky News cameraman is one of two journalists reported to have been killed in Egypt this morning.

Mick Dean, 61, was shot while covering protests in Cairo. He was reportedly taken to hospital but died a short time later.

Gulf News reporter Habiba Ahmed is also reported to have been killed during violent clashes in the Egyptian capital.

The killings happened as Egyptian security forces attempted to clear two protest camps occupied by supporters of former president Mohammed Morsi.

According to reports on the BBC, witnesses claim to have seen “at least 40 bodies”, while the Muslim Brotherhood has said that the death toll is now in the hundreds.

Deane was working with Sky News Middle East correspondent Sam Kiley who has been reporting from inside Rabaa al Adawiya protest camp in Cairo. Kiley talked about coming "under very heavy gunfire" and said the camp was facing a "massive military assault on largely unarmed civilians in very large numbers".

Riot police attack a protest camp in Cairo (Source: Reuters)

Sky News said in a statement: "It is with the greatest regret that Sky News announces the death of Mick Deane, an experienced camera operator, while working on assignment in Cairo this morning.

"Mick was part of a Sky News team reporting on the disturbances in the city with Middle East Correspondent Sam Kiley when he was shot and wounded. Despite receiving medical treatment for his injuries, he died shortly afterwards. None of the other members of the Sky News team were injured in the incident.

"Mick, aged 61, was a hugely experienced broadcast journalist. He had worked with Sky News as a camera operator for 15 years, most recently across the Middle East and previously in the United States. He was married with two sons."

Head of Sky News John Ryley said: "Everyone at Sky News is shocked and saddened by Mick’s death. He was a talented and experienced journalist who had worked with Sky News for many years. The loss of a much-loved colleague will be deeply felt across Sky News. Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife and family. We will give them our full support at this extremely difficult time.”

This piece first appreared on Press Gazette

Mick Dean. Photograph: Press Gazette
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Italian PM Matteo Renzi resigns after referendum No vote

Europe's right-wing populists cheered the result. 

Italy's centrist Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was forced to resign late on Sunday after he lost a referendum on constitutional change.

With most ballots counted, 60 per cent of Italians voted No to change, according to the BBC. The turn out was nearly 70 per cent. 

Voters were asked whether they backed a reform to Italy's complex political system, but right-wing populists have interpreted the referendum as a wider poll on the direction of the country.

Before the result, former Ukip leader Nigel Farage tweeted: "Hope the exit polls in Italy are right. This vote looks to me to be more about the Euro than constitutional change."

The leader of France's far-right Front National, Marine Le Pen, tweeted "bravo" to her Eurosceptic "friend" Matteo Salvini, a politician who campaigned for the No vote. She described the referendum result as a "thirst for liberty". 

In his resignation speech, Renzi told reporters he took responsibility for the outcome and added "good luck to us all". 

Since gaining office in 2014, Renzi has been a reformist politician. He introduced same-sex civil unions, made employment laws more flexible and abolished small taxes, and was known by some as "Europe's last Blairite".

However, his proposed constitutional reforms divided opinion even among liberals, because of the way they removed certain checks and balances and handed increased power to the government.

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.