Strong PMI figures indicate return to growth in Q2 2013

Maybe things don't suck?

Good news, everybody! The economy may actually not be terrible forever, according to data from Markit economics.

The UK all-sector PMI, an index which measures business activity throughout the economy, indicates that growth in Britain is set to be the highest it's been since March 2011. Values above 50 represent an expanding economy and values below 50 a contracting one: for June, the PMI is 56.0. That also means that the average for Q2 2012 is 54.2, well up from the average of 51.2 for Q1 2012. In other words, expect a healthy GDP figure on 25 July, when the ONS releases its preliminary estimate.

The best news in the release, though, is the data on new business inflows. That's the amount of new orders taken on by companies, and could be seen as representing a truer picture of economic growth, because it is less skewed by fluctuations in productivity or order fulfilment. And it is the highest it's been for six years. So too is the estimate Markit gives for employment. If it follows through into the ONS statistics (unemployment figures are due 17 July), there'll really be something for the government to celebrate:

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"