Is Ofgem “failing consumers”?

Five questions answered on MPs criticism of Ofgem.

A group of MPs have come forward and said energy regulator Ofgem is “failing consumers”. We answer five questions on the MPs’ problem with Ofgem.

What exactly has Ofgem been criticised for and by whom?

 The Energy and Climate Change Committee (ECCC) has written a report saying that the watchdog was "failing consumers by not taking all possible steps to improve openness".

They added that greater transparency over the profits made by the big six energy (E.On, SSE, British Gas, Npower, EDF and Scottish Power) companies is needed.

"Greater transparency is urgently needed to reassure consumers that high energy prices are not fuelling excessive profits," the committee said.
Adding that Ofgem had not fully implemented the recommendations of the accountants it commissioned to improve how energy companies report their profits.

What have Ofgem said?

Ofgem has responded by saying it made companies produce yearly financial statements, which they had then been reviewed by accountants.

"Ofgem has made energy companies produce yearly financial statements, which have been reviewed twice by independent accountants and found to be fit for purpose," Ofgem's senior partner for markets, Rachel Fletcher, told the BBC.

However, Ofgem did admit that energy companies have been poor when it comes to communicating with customers.

So, what’s the problem with this?

The committee say forensic accountants are needed to properly understand these accounts and work out the correct profit, because the companies have different divisions to deal with different functions of their business and these often buy and sell services and energy from each other. This makes it difficult to determine how much profit is actually being made.

"Ofgem needs to use its teeth a bit more and force the energy companies to do everything they can to prove that they are squeaky clean when it comes to making and reporting their profits," said committee member John Robertson.

What have the independent experts said?

"We want the government to introduce simple energy pricing and a clear ring-fence between generation and supply businesses, so consumers can see exactly what they're paying for and be more confident that there is effective competition in the energy market," Which? executive director Richard Lloyd told the BBC.  

Angela Knight, the chief executive of Energy UK, a body which represents energy companies, said she thinks companies have come a long way on transparency.

"Energy companies all publish annual accounts and, in addition, both the generation and supply parts of the business provide Ofgem with all the information about revenues, costs and profits for which the regulator asks," she told the BBC.

What else did the committee say?

They also reprimanded the government for not helping poorer families with their energy bills more. Adding that using levies on fuel bills to raise funds for social and environmental programmes may end up hitting those on low incomes.

Ofgem has been criticised. Photograph: Getty Images

Heidi Vella is a features writer for Nridigital.com

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Why it's a mistake to assume that Jeremy Corbyn has already won

The shadow chief secretary to the Treasury on why the race to be Labour's leader is far from over.

They think it’s all over.

But they’re wrong.

The fat lady has yet to sing.

The commentary and reporting around the Labour party leadership campaign has started to assume we have a winner already in Jeremy Corbyn. The analysis, conjecture, predictions/complete guesswork about what happens next has begun in earnest. So we have seen speculation about who will be appointed to a Corbyn shadow cabinet, and “meet the team” pieces about Jeremy’s backroom operation.

Which is all very interesting and makes for the usual Westminster knockabout of who might be up and who might be going in the other direction pdq...

But I think it’s a mistake to say that Jeremy has already won.

Because I hear that tens of thousands of Labour party members, affiliates and registered supporters are yet to receive their ballot papers. And I am one of them. I can’t remember the last time I checked my post quite so religiously! But alas, my papers are yet to arrive.

This worries me a bit about the process. But mostly (assuming all the remaining ballots finally land in enough time to let us all vote) it tells me that frankly it’s still game on as far as the battle to become the next leader of the Labour party is concerned.

And this is reinforced when we consider the tens of thousands who have apparently received their papers but who have yet to vote. At every event I have attended in the last couple of weeks, and in at least half of all conversations I have had with members across the country, members are still making their minds up.

This is why we have to continue fighting for every vote until the end – and I will be fighting to get out every vote I possibly can for Yvette Cooper.

Over the campaign, Yvette has shown that she has a clear vision of the kind of Britain that she wants to see.

A Britain that tackles head-on the challenges of globalisation. Instead of the low-wage low-skill cul-de-sac being crafted by the Tories, Yvette's vision is for 2m more high skill manufacturing jobs. To support families she will prioritise a modern childcare system with 30 hours of fully funded child care for all 3 and 4 year olds and she will revive the bravery of post war governments to make sure 2m more homes are built within ten years.

It's an optimistic vision which taps into what most people in this country want. A job and a home.

And the responses of the focus groups on Newsnight a few days ago were telling – Yvette is clearly best placed to take us on the long journey to the 2020 general election by winning back former Labour voters.

We will not win an election without winning these groups back – and we will have to move some people who were in the blue column this time, to the red one next time. There is no other way to do it – and Yvette is the only person who can grow our party outwards so that once again we can build a winning coalition of voters across the country.